Top 10 Best Women Complete Golf Sets Reviewed In 2017

The 21st century has seen women breaking all barriers and entering the so called men’s foray, even in sports. Amongst all the traditional men sports that have caught a woman’s eye, Golf perhaps tops the list. In layman’s term, it is a game in which a specially designed small sized white balls hit across a green field of long stretch.

The total number of hits achieved and the accuracy achieved through the distance in each hit determines the point for the game and the winner. As of 2017, there are few women’s golf club sets that are really good but haven’t been around for a long time, so i had to update the listing and replace some of the old golf clubs i had listed.

Let’s dig in and see which are the best rated golf clubs for women.

 

 

Feel free to explore the podium, click on the pictures to find out more.

 

 

How to save up to 86%? Here is little trick.

You must visit the page of sales. Here is the link. If you don’t care about which brand is better, then you can choose the Women Complete Golf Sets by the price and buy from the one who will offer the greatest discount.

 

 

№1 – Nitro Women’s Blaster Golf Clubs

Nitro Women’s Blaster Golf Clubs
Pros
It is very affordable with a stylish look. These clubs have contain most of what a beginning golfer needs to get started.
 

This is a right handed, 15-piece set (10 clubs, bag, rain hood, and 3 head covers) of women’s golf clubs from Nitro. Included clubs are a driver, 3-wood, 21 degree hybrid, full irons from 5 to 9, and a pitching wedge as well as the putter. Graphite and steel shafts increase durability and strength. The club bag is also included.


 

№2 – Callaway Women’s Solaire Gems Amethyst Golf Clubs

Callaway Women’s Solaire Gems Amethyst Golf Clubs
Pros
The shallow faced woods and hybrids are more forgiving to help keep your shots on the fairway. The perimeter weighted 7-iron also results in longer and higher shots.
 

This 8-piece standard length set is a wonderful budget option from the world of Callaway golf club sets. This set includes a driver, 3-wood, and hybrid, as well as a perimeter weighted 7-iron, pitching wedge, sand wedge, and a premium Odyssey putter. It comes with a Callaway 8 pocket bag with cooler pocket and a removable purse.


 

№3 – Wilson Staff Women’s Ultra Package Complete Golf Clubs

Wilson Staff Women’s Ultra Package Complete Golf Clubs
Pros
It is very affordable, which is great for beginning players. The set contains a full iron set, unlike some smaller sets.
 

From Wilson, this set includes a 460 cc driver, 3-wood, and a 4 hybrid. There is also a full set of irons from 5 to 9, a pitching wedge, and a putter. These clubs feature graphite shafts in the woods for a lighter weight, with steel shafts on the irons. Included is a cart bag with multiple pockets.


 

№4 – Callaway Women’s 2016 Solaire Complete Golf Clubs

Callaway Women’s 2016 Solaire Complete Golf Clubs
Pros
The Solaire set comes with a stylish bag with a six way divider. Among all of the Callaway women’s golf club sets, this one has superior quality and includes a full set of irons to cover all of your distance needs.
 

This is a 13 piece set from the line of Callaway golf club sets. Included is a driver that provides forgiveness for off-center hits. The lightweight graphite shafts and engineered clubs help get the most of your ball flight no matter the lie. This set comes with a premium Odyssey putter and club head covers.


 

№5 – Callaway Strata Ultimate 16-Piece Women’s Golf Club Set

Callaway Strata Ultimate 16-Piece Women’s Golf Club Set
Pros
These are very forgiving clubs for those off-shots. It contains all clubs possibly needed, including a sand wedge and two different hybrids. The grips are highly rated.
 

This full set includes everything for a beginning golfer. This is manufactured by Callaway. It includes a titanium driver, 3-wood, 4 and 5 hybrids, and irons from 6 to Callaway Strata comes with a pitching and a sand wedge as well as the putter. It also has 4 club head covers, a multi-pocket bag with a stand, and rain cover.


 

№6 – Precise GT-R Women’s Petite Golf Clubs

Precise GT-R Women’s Petite Golf Clubs
Pros
The price is very affordable. The large 460 cc driver offers sufficient distance with off-center shot forgiveness. The graphite shafts provide flexibility and strength. The shorter length is perfect for petite women.
 

Here is another option for shorter length clubs. These are also right handed and include the driver, 3-wood, a 24 degree hybrid, 6 to 9 irons, a pitching wedge, and a putter. It comes with a bag with built in stand and 3 club head covers.


 

№7 – Wilson Ultra Women’s Complete Golf Clubs

Wilson Ultra Women’s Complete Golf Clubs
Pros
These clubs feature great affordability, especially for beginning golfers. A full set of irons is included. The multi-pocket bag is big enough for shoes and other needed equipment.
 

This is a newer option from the Wilson Ultra line. This set includes a driver, 3-wood, 4-hybrid, and irons from 5 to It also has a pitching wedge and standard putter. These clubs feature standard steel shafts irons. It comes with a standard bag.


 

№8 – Confidence Golf Lady Power Hybrid Golf Club

Confidence Golf Lady Power Hybrid Golf Club
Pros
These clubs are good for beginning women golfers, especially if you’ve had a hard time with long irons (2, 3, 4, and It is very affordably priced. The bag does have a stand and a rain cover. Fewer clubs in the bag means less weight to carry.
 

There has been a trend of sorts toward hybrid golf club sets. This set from Confidence Golf is an example. This set includes a 24 degree hybrid and irons from 6 to There is a pitching wedge as well. For driving, there is an oversized wood. Also included is a bag featuring a pop out stand.


 

№9 – Wilson Women’s Hope Complete Golf Club Set

Wilson Women’s Hope Complete Golf Club Set
Pros
Wilson makes a donation to breast cancer research with the purchase of this set. It is affordable and it comes with all clubs that you could possible need in your bag, sand wedge included.
 

From the line of Wilson golf club sets, this set has everything for the lady golfer. It includes a large driver and 5-wood as well as a hybrid club, irons from 6 to 9, and a pitching wedge, sand wedge, and putter. Graphite shafts on the driver, wood, and hybrid are included with steel shafts on the irons.


 

№10 – Golf Girl FWS2 Petite Lady Hybrid Golf Club Set

Golf Girl FWS2 Petite Lady Hybrid Golf Club Set
Pros
There is a bag included with multiple pockets, including a full length clothing pocket. This set is very affordably priced and is among the best golf club sets for beginners and is offered in left handed golf club sets.
 

Among the hybrid golf club sets, the Golf Girl Petite set is perfect for women of shorter stature. You get an 11 piece set including a driver, wood, two hybrids, irons from 5 to 9, and a pitching wedge. The 460 cc driver is the biggest allowed.


 

A beginner’s guide to picking the best golf clubs

According to Ortiz, the #1 mistake that beginners make is going into a shop and buying an entire set of golf clubs at once just because the bundled price seems like a good deal. With this, you end up buying clubs that are not suited for your level of playing.

A better rule of thumb is to start off investing in 5-6 individual pieces that are more tailored for your needs. Following the concept of quality over quantity, buying fewer pieces that are on par with your level allows you to perform better, will get you better results, and allow for quicker improvements.

For Women:

Since men and women have different issues on the green, their sets should be different. As opposed to men, women struggle more with distance than consistency. Most women tend to hit the ball relatively straight but do not get distance with the clubs. The most important one in the bag is a driver, preferably one with at least 14 degrees of loft.Other tips:

Irons are divided into three sets; long irons (2, 3 and 4-irons), mid-irons (5, 6 and 7-irons) and short irons (8 and 9-irons, plus the pitching wedge).

Long irons are used to hit the ball further with a shorter loft, while short irons are designed to produce a higher loft. The higher loft results in a steeper ball flight angle from the initial elevation to final drop. Refer to the chart for a visual understanding of the difference in lofts between short, mid and long irons.

As you’re piecing together your set of irons, it’s recommended that each of your clubs is separated by 4 degrees of loft, increasing from the 3-iron to the pitching wedge. This gives you about 12 to 14 yards difference between each club. Long hitters often keep irons separated by 3 degrees, while short hitters can use a 5-degree difference to ensure proper gapping.

Tips on buying ladies golf clubs

In general, women are smaller than men, and they typically have a slower swing speed. This affects the specifications of the club you should choose. If your swing speed is 70 miles per hour or above, you can probably handle a 3-wood in addition to your 5- and possibly a 7-wood in your golf bag. Women with a slow swing speed of under 60 miles per hour should consider a titanium clubface. If you have a slow golf swing and you have trouble hitting the ball into the air, a clubface with more loft will help. Try a 13 or 14 degree loft on your driver, and a 16 degree loft on your 3-wood. For a swing speed of 60 miles per hour or less, you may want to eliminate the 3-wood altogether and include a 5-, 7- and even a 9-wood. There should be a 1-inch difference in shaft length for each odd-numbered club. For added height in your trajectory, try an offset hosel (where the club head meets the shaft) and a flexible shaft.

Compare the best golf club brands

Originally called Cleveland Classics, Cleveland Golf started as a company with a focus on creating replicas of classic golf clubs in 1979. It was purchased in 1990 by ski equipment manufacturer Rossignol, who changed the name to Cleveland Golf. Today, the company sponsors world-class Tour players while also selling innovative equipment to golfers at every level.

Hole-in-one recognition: Cleveland Golf is happy to send a recognition certificate to customers who got a hole-in-one while using a Cleveland Golf club. Send relevant information to customer service.

My Custom Wedge: My Custom Wedge allows consumers to fully customize their wedge. Find your perfect fit, then customize the paint, logo and text for a wedge unlike any other.

Sponsor the Team: Cleveland Golf/Srixon passionately supports youth golf, which is why they created the fundraising platform of Sponsor the Team. It allows all athletics and activities programs at the high school level to raise money for their program by selling Cleveland Golf and Srixon Golf products to sponsors. In turn, the programs receive a significant portion of the sales back in the form of a rebate. Coaches can register for the program online.

Scoring Clinic: The Scoring Clinic is a place where golfers of all abilities and levels go to improve scores. The clinic combines wedge education with short-game instruction offered by a certified golf teaching professional. In addition, all registered attendees receive a 588 RTX 2.0 wedge. Look up upcoming events online.

Fitting: Consumers who live near Huntington Beach, CA, can take advantage of Cleveland Golf’s fitting studio, where they can find their perfect fit using the latest technology by trained fitting professionals. Individuals outside of this area can still get fitted through one of their local Cleveland Golf authorized retailers or at a Fitting Day event in their area.

How to Choose Best Women’s Golf Clubs

Length

First thing which women should look for in this aspect is the length of the golf clubs. It directly impacts their swinging ability, before effecting their overall game. So no compromise can be made with this aspect in the selection of golf clubs.

The length of a golf club depends on the height of a female golfer. Since women golfers are generally smaller than their male counterparts, same is the case with their golf clubs. But if a woman possesses similar height to that of a man, she can go for clubs longer in length.

Shaft

From shafts made of graphite to those of steel, both of them have their own pros and cons for the female golfer. When the former one is lighter in weight but produces lesser distance, the latter is heavier but can generate greater yardages. So for women who are physical thin, Graphite suits their needs. But one who is capable of lifting heavier clubs, Steel should be their choice.

Loft

For female golfers who are newer in this trait, they should select clubs with higher lofts. Such type of clubs can get the ball airborne rather easily than lower lofted shafts. And as a result, even not a perfect shot can produce a desirable result.

Moving towards the experienced athletes, their first choice should be lesser loft clubs. Since expertise is not an issue here, they can generate much more precise shots using these club sets.

Clubheads

The perimeter-weighted club-heads are becoming increasingly famous among-st female golfers nowadays. Since it increases the length of a club’s sweet spot, no such expertise is required to handle such equipment. So if you’re looking for the best women’s golf clubs, go for one which possesses the similar technology.

The Basic Golf Set

A standard golf club set for women consists of three woods, seven irons, two wedges and a putter. The woods are the driver, the 3-wood and the 5-wood. The traditional set of irons is made up of the 3-, 4-, 5-, 6-, 7-, 8- and 9-iron. Irons should match, so you can easily learn how much distance you get from each one. This allows you to develop consistency in your golf shots. In addition, the standard set will have a pitching wedge and a sand wedge, along with the putter. These days, many women find that they prefer to replace the lower irons with hybrids. You might replace the 3-, 4-, 5- and even 6-iron with a hybrid club, which is easier to hit. Your lowest numbered hybrid should allow you to hit the ball 10 or 15 yards shorter than the highest numbered fairway wood.

Choosing a Ladies’ Wood

In general, women are smaller than men, and they typically have a slower swing speed. This affects the specifications of the club you should choose. If your swing speed is 70 miles per hour or above, you can probably handle a 3-wood in addition to your 5- and possibly a 7-wood in your golf bag. Women with a slow swing speed of under 60 miles per hour should consider a titanium clubface. If you have a slow golf swing and you have trouble hitting the ball into the air, a clubface with more loft will help. Try a 13 or 14 degree loft on your driver, and a 16 degree loft on your 3-wood. For a swing speed of 60 miles per hour or less, you may want to eliminate the 3-wood altogether and include a 5-, 7- and even a 9-wood. There should be a 1-inch difference in shaft length for each odd-numbered club. For added height in your trajectory, try an offset hosel (where the club head meets the shaft) and a flexible shaft.

Choosing a Ladies’ Iron and Wedge

Experienced women golfers may be able to handle a 5-iron, but those with a slow swing speed can use a 6- or a 7-iron as their longest iron. In that case, a hybrid or fairway wood can replace a long iron for distance. Irons with a wide, rounded sole and deep back cavity with weighting on the perimeter help with a slower swing. The pitching wedge should have at least 4 degrees more than the 9 iron, and the sand wedge should have a 56 degree loft, minimum. Try out a lob wedge as an extra club that allows you hit a high, soft shot when you are close to the green and need to hit over a bunker.

The Loft, Length & Distance

Irons are divided into three sets; long irons (2, 3 and 4-irons), mid-irons (5, 6 and 7-irons) and short irons (8 and 9-irons, plus the pitching wedge).

Long irons are used to hit the ball further with a shorter loft, while short irons are designed to produce a higher loft. The higher loft results in a steeper ball flight angle from the initial elevation to final drop. Refer to the chart for a visual understanding of the difference in lofts between short, mid and long irons.

As you’re piecing together your set of irons, it’s recommended that each of your clubs is separated by 4 degrees of loft, increasing from the 3-iron to the pitching wedge. This gives you about 12 to 14 yards difference between each club. Long hitters often keep irons separated by 3 degrees, while short hitters can use a 5-degree difference to ensure proper gapping.

Types Of Shaft And Flex

The type of shaft and flex you choose affects the feel of the club, the distance it produces and your swing speed. If increasing your swing speed is your goal, choose the lighter graphite material to generate a faster swing. If you’re satisfied with your swing speed but would like more control over the club head, the heavier steel shaft will provide the balance you want.

Flex is how the shaft twists and turns during the swing and it largely depends on your style of play, as well as how far you hit the ball. Flex is divided into five categories: Ladies, Senior, Regular, Stiff and X-Stiff. Refer to the chart to learn what type of flex is right for you.

Before Spending, Identify Your Golf Goals

Decide on your goals before you go shopping, because identifying realistic goals will make shopping much easier. For example, if you are taking up the game just so you can play twice a year with your brother-in-law, there’s no need to spend much time, effort or money on picking out clubs. If you are wildly enthusiastic about golf and plan on playing every chance you get, your sights can be set higher.

Honestly Assess Your Levels of Interest and Dedication

Before you can determine how much you’re willing to spend, and on what caliber of clubs, you must honestly assess your dedication. Will you be practicing much? Are you willing to take golf lessons? If you answer “no” or “probably not,” then cheaper clubs are the way to go. Answering “yes” could be a sign that you’re not aiming too high if you want something more expensive.

First Buy: New Clubs vs. Used Clubs

If you’re unsure of your dedication to golf, or if you have a history of taking up a hobby only to drop it later, used clubs might be a good choice.

They’ll be much cheaper, of course, than new. And because they’ll be so much cheaper, they can be easily replaced later.

Set Your Budget

Golf clubs can be very expensive. How much you are willing to spend might be tied to how dedicated to the game you think you’ll be. On the other hand, if you have plenty of money to spend and want top-of-the-line equipment, go for it.

A good option for many beginners, however, is looking for an inexpensive first set. That way, if you don’t follow through with the game, you haven’t wasted much money.

Understanding Shaft Options

Two basics of golf shafts that beginners should most pay attention to are shaft composition (steel or graphite) and shaft flex (how much the shaft bends during the swing). Graphite is lighter and can help generate swing speed; steel is cheaper. Women and seniors will most likely benefit from graphite shafts with a softer flex. Younger, stronger men might go with regular or stiff shafts, but keep in mind that most teaching pros say many golfers use shafts that are too stiff.

What About a Clubfitting?

If your first set of clubs is going to be a new one, you might consider a clubfitting. Many teaching pros do an in-depth clubfitting that lasts 30-45 minutes. If you don’t do that, then being measured in a pro shop to make sure the clubs you choose are well-suited to your body type can’t hurt. The standard, off-the-shelf length for golf clubs corresponds to a male who is 5-foot-10. If you are around that size, then standard will probably work just fine. If much shorter or taller, get fitted.

The Clubs Can Make Golf Easier

There’s no substitute for a good golf swing. But brand new golfers can make it easier on themselves by choosing clubs that are geared to higher-handicappers (also known as “game improvement clubs”). Choose irons that are perimeter weighted and cavity-backed. Look at “hybrid” sets, where the long irons and sometimes mid-irons are replaced by hybrid clubs. Get a driver with more loft, not less. Pay no attention at all to what the Tour players are using. Focus on clubs with low centers of gravity and high moments of intertia. Any staffer at a decent golf pro shop can help you choose clubs that fit your skill level.

Club types

There are a lot of variations of clubs, but there are really only a few types. There are woods, or drivers, normally with a wooden club at the end. Wood has been the traditional substance, but now titanium and ore modern metals are used more often. These are used for tee-off shots and designed to hit the ball a long way.

Another type of club are called irons, because the small club at the end is made of iron, and has a wedge shape at the end. These clubs range from drivers to chippers, and have a wide variety of uses. The various wedges at the end are at different angles, and affect how high the ball goes, as well as how far it goes. Some people split wedges into their own category, but they are the irons that have the greatest angle to the head and are used for chipping onto the green. Usually this is a short shot that needs to go high in the air.

The third type of club is the putter, which has a flat end and is used on the green for short shots. There is a lot of technology used in putters, and it is arguably the most critical club you can have. There are a lot of different types of putters, but you will usually need only one in your bag, depending on the type and style you choose.

While there are endless possibilities for specific types of clubs, the official rules of golf say you may have 14 clubs in your bag when in competition. Just because the rules say you may have no more than 14, that does not mean you must have 14. In theory you could play with just one club and not carry a bag at all, but very few will try that strategy.

A base set for beginners would include a driver, whether wood or iron, a hybrid, a couple of irons, a wedge and a putter. That would be just a few basic clubs to get you started, and from playing you will realize what your needs are, and can add to your collection as needed. There is also a fairly new club called a hybrid that combines elements of two or three in one, reducing the number you need. Usually this combines the wood and the iron, and eliminates the need for at least two levels of irons and maybe two or three levels of woods.

Woods and irons have numbers, such as a two-iron, three-iron and so forth, referrin to the level the wedge has at the end of the club.

  1. Club parts

It is also important to have a basic understanding of the parts of a golf club, especially if you are a beginner. Just as in clubs themselves, there are a lot of variations depending on the club maker and the latest technology. No matter the type of club, each club has four basic parts. Those parts start with the grip, made of rubber. For the best grip find the ones that feels the best in your hands. The shaft is graphite or or metal, and the length depends on the club it is attached to and has differing levels of flexibility. These two parts are fairly standard.

The other two parts, the hosel and the head, are the most critical and the most technical in nature. The Hosel is a part between the shaft and the head of the club that can be adjusted. This controls the angle of the club to a large degree, and you may adjust this to fit your swing. This is often a solid piece, but professionals have adjustable hosels on their clubs, and can adjust them at any time. The final part is the club head, which is what actually hits the ball. The clubheads have different technology depending on the manufacturer, and is geared toward specific talent levels.

Custom fitted

You may also get clubs that are custom fitted to you. Golf pros, or golf shops, have equipment and means of figuring out the best clubs for your physical stature and ability. Some golf experts say it is even more important for a beginner to have custom fitted clubs. A professional can adjust to about any kind of club if need be, while a beginner needs all the advantages he or she can get while getting some confidence in the game.

Most golf professionals recommend this because everyone is different. There is a lot of technology in golf now, and a lot of things you can adjust on a club that will fit your game. There are a lot of technical terms as well, such as the lie, length, tightness or looseness, and all of those things a golf pro can use to fit a set of clubs to you individually.

Ability level

While it is a good idea to have clubs that take advantage of your abilities, there is no real reason to have clubs that are beyond your ability level. That is why a beginner does not really need all 14 clubs sanctioned by the PGA, but you can grow into them.

Figuring out your handicap is a good measure of your skill level. Finding that out can help you determine which clubs you should get. A golf pro at a golf shop can give the best advice for your individual situation.

How to buy

Several manufacturers sell complete sets of clubs in one bundle. A lot o beginners like this option. In the past though, the latest technology was not included, so more advanced golfers shied away from the bundled set. Technology is developing faster now, so that is not the case. You can now get a complete set that also includes the latest technology. If you can get a set that has been custom fitted for you, you will be set up for success on the golf course.

It might be best to get a basic set of clubs if you are a beginner. You can add clubs, and even hybrids, to your collection as your knowledge and skill level increases.

Simple Rules for Buying the Right Golf Equipment.

Be honest. What you really need is a swing change. But what you really want is a new driver. Or a sand wedge. Or a putter. And you want it so much, you’re not merely dropping hints to anyone who’ll listen, you’re tearing out catalog pages and leaving them on the living room coffee table.

The trouble is, like everything in golf, buying equipment isn’t as easy as window shopping. It’s a world of precision, and all that precision is designed to help you enjoy the game. Still, it can be confusing, whether you’re buying for yourself or someone else. Let me show you the best way to approach the buying process. Go slowly and study the information in these eight simple rules, and you just might get what you need — and what you want.

1. Know your skill level

Despite what the ads say, you are not Tiger Woods. What you are is either a beginner, an intermediate player (somebody who shoots 80 to 95, let’s say) or an advanced player (someone who consistently breaks 80, or about 7 percent of the male golf population and less than 1 percent of the female golf population). Each level of player needs something different.

Beginner: This group needs as much help as possible. Believe it or not, that often means less equipment, not more. You don’t need to go through an extensive fitting program, because you really don’t know how to swing yet. Ask for clubs that fit your strength and general posture when you stand to the ball properly. A basic set that includes two or three woods (choose from the following: Driver with a 10-13 degree loft, 3-, 5- and/or 7-wood) and a handful of irons (5-, 7- and 9-iron, pitching wedge, sand wedge) and putter are plenty. That’s not to say you shouldn’t buy a full set of clubs, just put the rest of the set in storage until you need them. The clubs you buy should be forgiving. Oversize, perimeter-weighted clubs will help you enjoy the game.

Intermediate: This is the bulk of the golf nation and who most new equipment is designed to satisfy. You can have your pick of any clubs you want, but I’d focus on forgiveness. You want your misses to stay in bounds. Most companies will be happy to tell you which of their irons are most forgiving. As for comparing or testing various clubs from competing manufacturers, some are more worthwhile than others. One interesting concept is a special project from club design expert Ralph Maltby called the Maltby Playability Factor, which rates clubs in terms of forgiveness. But the only comparison rating that really matters is yours.

Advanced: The entire cornucopia of golf equipment is at your doorstep, but even for you, I’d still lean toward clubs that offer forgiveness. Still, you are on the verge of being able to play irons that mix perimeter weighting with a more traditional-looking blade design. Don’t make the switch, however, unless you believe you are being held back by your current equipment.

2. Know what you need

A set of three woods and eight irons has been the standard configuration. Not anymore. Assuming you are past the beginning stage of the game, get yourself custom-fit for irons. The fitting procedure may tell you things about your game you didn’t know. Like maybe you’re playing the wrong shaft. Most average golfers swing clubs with shafts too stiff, and they are continually fighting the club, trying to produce that one shot out of 20 in which everything comes together. How do you know the shaft is too stiff? If you can’t feel where the clubhead is during the swing, this may be one consequence, but again, it’s what feels right to you. You want to feel in control of the clubhead. Regardless of how good you think you are, I recommend you take a pass on the X-Flex shaft and the 1- and 2-iron. If you put more hybrids or even higher-lofted woods in your bag, you’ll likely improve your score without changing your swing.

3. Bigger is better — Sometimes

There’s a reason the drivers you see in magazines are the size of a genetically mutated grapefruit. Supersize often means a greater moment of inertia. (forgiveness). Bigger also means the driver likely will be made of titanium and have the spring-like effect that provides better transfer of momentum from the clubhead to the ball (resulting in more distance). There is a point of diminishing returns, however. Once you get much beyond 400 cubic centimeters (more than twice the size of Callaway’s original Big Bertha), the forgiveness factor starts flattening out – diminishing returns and the head gets too cumbersome. Be leery of the length of your driver’s shaft, too. The best players in the world, who can have any length shaft they want, have settled on 44 or 44 3/4 inches (Tiger has even used a 43.5 inch driver). Your typical off-the-rack titanium driver has a 45-inch shaft. My advice: Go for a shorter shaft or grip down a little. There will not be any significant loss of distance, and your accuracy will improve.

4. Consider price when picking a ball

The average player will not lose anything by playing the best, most expensive tour balls on the market. But the average player likely won’t notice any difference in performance using the less expensive models, either. My shopping rule for balls is a simple one: If someone is buying the balls for you, go for the gold standard. If you’re buying them yourself, be thrifty. Remember: Most balls today are better than the golfers who choose to use them.

5. Get on a launch monitor

Science now tells us the best launch conditions for a driver at 110 miles per hour are 12 to 13 degrees above horizontal with a spin rate of 2,200 to 2,500 revolutions per minute. Slower swing speeds require higher launch angles and more spin. Science also has managed to develop good launch monitors that can evaluate this information from your swing. Use a launch monitor with caution it is a guide only and will get you into the right range of conditions you seek. The rest is up to you unless you are a super elite golfer and need to tweak your equipment. If you are hitting the sweet spot try to get a ball speed of 1.4 to 1.5 times your swing speed. If the (good) launch monitor shows you’re not doing that, you may need to change your driver, your swing or both. Most drivers today are a lot better than we are so get enough loft 10 degrees to 15 degrees if your swing speed is slow (75 mph) and the make sure the shaft flex suites your swing speed. A rule of thumb is, Stiff for 90 to 100 mph, R-flex for 75 to 90mph and A-flex for below 75 and below.

6. Fill the gap in your wedge game

Today’s iron lofts are about a club and a half stronger than they were 25 years ago. (Jack Nicklaus’ 8-iron of yesteryear is nearly equal to some of the stronger pitching wedges out there today.) Club manufacturers have designed them that way to make us feel as if we’re hitting the ball farther. The problem, however, is the loft on the typical sand wedge has remained at 56 degrees. Consequently, there’s probably a gap somewhere in your wedge game.

Here’s what to do: Identify the loft on your 9-iron or pitching wedge (if you don’t know, your club pro or the manufacturer can tell you). Decide if you need a wedge with a loft between your sand wedge and pitching wedge. You don’t want more than 4 or 5 degrees loft difference between your wedges, otherwise you’ll find yourself with a yardage and no full-swing club that carries that distance. Furthermore, if you buy a lob wedge (and I’m not convinced most players need one), be careful not to get one with too much bounce (the trailing edge of the club’s sole is lower than the leading edge of the club). A lot of bounce, typically found on a sand wedge, is only helpful out of heavy rough or soft sand. From a tight lie, you might blade shots over the green.

7. Use clubs with proper lie angle

Once you reach the intermediate level, getting fitted for irons is important. Well-struck approach shots may miss the green if your clubs don’t fit you. Specifically, the issue is lie angle. Ideally, the sole of the club as it makes contact with the ball should be level with the ground. If the toe is up, then well-struck shots will go to the left and you will need to flatten the lie. If the toe is down then well-struck shots will go right, and the lie needs to be more upright to correct the flight. Make sure you’re being fit for your swing, not just your setup. A good clubfitter will have you hit shots off a lie board, which is a type of mat that will leave a mark on the sole to show how to adjust the lie if necessary.

8. Invest in a new putter

Approximately 45% of your score is generated on the putting green, therefore a good putter is essential. You use your putter more than any other club in your bag.

When considering your next putter, understand that the shape and weight distribution of the putter is important in determining its forgiveness.There are basically three head shapes for conventional length putters.

Mallet style putters are more forgiving, whilst blade style putters are less forgiving.

Putter length is crucial and many golfers are putting with putters that are too long for them. Make sure that your putter is the correct length and fit. Once you have the correct putter, now it’s time to brush up on your putting stroke. We have a Free Putting Guide that you can consult to get you started.

9. Take a lesson

The best gift for a golfer, no matter who is paying for it, is a lesson. This will cost about one-fifth of the price of a good driver and one-tenth the price of a new set of clubs — and may be better for your game. Almost as good, and even better for your quality of life, is a gym membership. Good strength and flexibility will do as much or more for your game as new equipment. It may not be as much fun as waggling that new driver, but come next summer when your workouts have made you healthier and stronger, your game should improve, too. Furthermore, an exercise regimen will help you avoid injuries. Because if you’re injured, you won’t be able to test all the new equipment, right?

 

 

 

How to save up to 86%? Here is little trick.

You must visit the page of sales. Here is the link. If you don’t care about which brand is better, then you can choose the Women Complete Golf Sets by the price and buy from the one who will offer the greatest discount.

 

 

Final Word

The best women’s golf club varies from every single golfer to the other. It varies according to their height, their swing speed, their personal preferences and a handful of other factors. So before setting your eye on a typical product, be familiar with your own physique. Only then will you be able to buy a club which can improve your game.

So, TOP10 of Women Complete Golf Sets:

 

 

Questions? Leave a comment below!

Chatting about Women Complete Golf Sets is my passion! Leave me a question in the comments, I answer each and every one and would love to get to know you better!

by Don Oliver | Last Updated September 1, 2017



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