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Top Of The Best Track Lighting Accessories Reviewed In 2018

Last Updated November 1, 2018
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Adrian HoffmanHi! My name is Reginald Meyer. After putting in 50+ hours of research and testing, I made a list of the best Track Lighting Accessories of 2018 and explained their differences and advantages.

In this article, I will be categorizing the items according to their functions and most typical features. I hope that my Top 10 list will provide you great options in buying the right fit for you.

 

 

Feel free to explore the podium, click on the pictures to find out more.

 

 

How to save up to 86%? Here is little trick.

You must visit the page of sales. Here is the link. If you don’t care about which brand is better, then you can choose the Track Lighting Accessories by the price and buy from the one who will offer the greatest discount.

 

 

№1 – Progress Lighting Black P9106-31 Track Accessories

 
Progress Lighting Black P9106-31 Track Accessories
Pros
Finish: Black
 

 

№2 – Nora Lighting NT-327B Outlet Adapter Track Accessory

 
Nora Lighting NT-327B Outlet Adapter Track Accessory
Pros
Brand: Nora Lighting
– Part No.: NT-327B
– UPC: 73218038105
 

 

№3 – Elco Lighting EP814BZ EP814 Outlet Adapter

 
Elco Lighting EP814BZ EP814 Outlet Adapter
Pros
Outlet Adapter for 1 or 2 Circuit Track
Junction box is listed for through branch circuit wiring and has seven knockouts with true pry out slots
Integral Thermal Protector guards against misuse of insulation materials and improper lamping
Reliable! I really like this!
 

 

Color temperature

After lumens, the next concept you’ll want to understand is color temperature. Measured on the Kelvin scale, color temperature isn’t really a measure of heat. Instead, it’s a measure of the color that a light source produces, ranging from yellow on the low end of the scale to bluish on the high end, with whitish light in the middle.

An easy way to keep track of color temperature is to think of a flame: it starts out yellow and orange, but when it gets really hot, it turns blue. You could also think of color temperature in terms of the sun — low, yellowy color temperatures mimic the tone of light at sunrise or sunset, while hotter, more bluish-white color temperatures are more akin to daylight (sure enough, bulbs with color temperatures like these are commonly called “daylight” bulbs). This is also why a lot of people prefer high color temperatures during the day and lower color temperatures in the morning and evening.

Generally speaking, incandescents sit at the bottom of the scale with their yellow light, while CFLs and LEDs have long been thought to tend toward the high, bluish end of the spectrum. This has been a steady complaint about new lighting alternatives, as many people prefer the warm, familiar, low color temperature of incandescents. Manufacturers are listening, though, and in this case they heard consumers loud and clear, with more and more low-color-temperature CFL and LED options hitting the shelves. Don’t believe me? Take another look at those two paper lamps in the picture above, because they’re both CFL bulbs — from the same manufacturer, no less.

Sylvania often color codes its packaging. Blue indicates a hot, bluish color temperature, while the lighter shade indicates a white, more neutral light.

Bulb shape

As you’re probably aware, light bulbs come in a fairly wide variety of shapes. Sure, it’s easy enough to tell a hardware store clerk that you want “one of those flamey-looking lights,” or “just a normal ol’ bulby light bulb,” but knowing the actual nomenclature might save you some time.

Watch this

Are pricey candelabra LEDs a smart upgrade for your chandelier?

Let’s start with the base of the bulb, the part that screws in. In the US, the most common shape by far is E26, with the “E” standing for Edison and the “26” referring to the diameter of the base in millimeters. You might also see E2bulbs from time to time, which is the European standard. Those should still fit into common American fixtures, but keep in mind that voltage ratings are different in the two regions, with American bulbs rated for 120 volts compared to 220-240 volts in Europe. For smaller sockets, like you might find with a candelabra, you’ll want to look for an E1base.

As for the bulb itself, the typical shape that you’re probably used to is an A1bulb. Increase that number to A2or A23, and you’ve got the same shape, but bigger. Bulbs made to resemble flames are F-shaped, which is easy enough to remember, as are globes, which go by the letter G. If it’s a floodlight you want, you’ll want to look for “BR” (bulging reflector) or “PAR” (parabolic aluminized reflector). Those bulbs are designed to throw all their light in one direction only, which makes them useful for spot lighting, overhead lighting and the headlights in your car.

Your automated-lighting options

It used to be that if you wanted your lights to turn on and off automatically, then you had to rely on a cheap wall socket timer, the kind you might use to control a Christmas tree. These days, with a modest boom in smart lighting currently under way, it’s easier than ever to dive into the sort of advanced automation controls that can make any home feel modern and futuristic. Use the right devices, and you’ll be able to control your lights in all sorts of creative ways, and make your life a little bit easier in the process.

The most obvious way to get started with smart lighting is with the bulbs themselves. You’ve got plenty of intelligent options from brands both big and small, and to find the one that’s best for you, you’re going to need to understand what sets them apart.

Connect with these 3IFTTT-friendly smart devices (pictures)

The first thing to look at is how the bulbs communicate with you. Some offer direct connections with your smart phone via Bluetooth or Wi-Fi, which makes setup as simple as screwing the thing in and following in-app pairing instructions.

Others transmit using a distinct frequency like ZigBee or Z-Wave. Bulbs like those might be a better fit for bigger smart home setups, as it’s typically a little easier to sync them up with things like motion detectors and smart locks. Setup can be slightly more advanced, as you’ll need a separate hub or gateway device capable of translating that distinct frequency into a Wi-Fi signal your router can comprehend.

Some smart bulbs come with their own gateway. Others, like the Cree Connected LED, require a third-party control device, like the Wink Hub.

Color control

If you’re looking for a little more color in your life, then be sure and take a look at a product like the Philips Hue Starter Kit. Aside from being fully automatable via a mobile app and control hub, the Hue LED bulbs are capable of on-demand color changes. Just pull out your phone, select one of millions of possible shades, and the light will match it. And if you’re into voice control, Hue bulbs hit the compatibility trifecta — they’ll work with Siri, Alexa, and the Google Assistant.

Because Philips opened its lighting controls to third-party developers, you’ll also find lots of fun novelty uses for Hue bulbs, like changing the color of your lights in rhythm with whatever music you’re playing. There’s even an app that’ll sync your Hue lights up with certain TV programming.

Hue lights are also directly compatible with the popular web service IFTTT, with recipes already available that will change the color of your lights to match the weather, or to signal a touchdown from your favorite football team, or even to indicate when your stocks are doing well.

Assess Your Current Home Décor

Start things off by visualizing the space that you want to install a pendant light in and create a mental picture of the exact look that you want to achieve.

Browse lighting to look for pendant lights that would fit the design style of the room and the statement you envisioned.

Sprocket Head from TECH Lighting

Track is an especially appealing option in situations that require long runs and can use line voltage (120V). Line voltage allows for longer runs without the concern for voltage drop. Through the use of a concealed conductor, track systems are able to safely run at 120V without the risk of shock. While there are low voltage track systems available, the majority of systems are line voltage.

To configure a track lighting system, there are four things to consider:

Layout and Components

Systems are available with standard straight track or with flexible track in single-circuit or two-circuit configurations. Almost any layout is possible using a creative selection of track connectors and track lengths. Depending on the type of track, systems can be installed directly to, or suspended from, the ceiling.

One of the most important factors to consider is how to provide power to a track system. If power is being supplied in the middle of a run, a canopy with a power feed is required. If power will be supplied at the end of a run, an end connector with a power feed can be used.

Fixtures

The first thing to consider when choosing fixtures for a track system is whether the two are compatible. It is important to choose fixtures that use the same track standard as the system itself. In some cases, manufacturers will offer adapters so that their fixtures can be used with several of their systems. Another thing to consider is what is being illuminated. Highlighting a piece of artwork would be best accomplished using a precision spot light while more general illumination might be better served with a flood light or pendant.

In addition to the track standard, the voltage of the fixture should also be considered. If a low voltage track head or pendant is to be used on a line voltage track, an inline transformer will be required. This usually takes the form of a small box near the point where the fixture attaches to the track. This transformer will convert the line voltage (120V) feed to the appropriate low voltage (12V) signal required by a low voltage fixture.

LEDme Galileo Low Voltage Track Lighting from WAC Lighting

Accessories

Most track fixtures can be modified for many applications by purchasing accessories. You can use special lenses to change the shape of the light (honeycomb louvers, spread lenses and beam elongating lenses) or the color (color lenses and color dichroic lenses). A framing projector or barn door accessory can be used to help direct and focus the light.

Extended Downrod

A non-standard downrod is used when the ceiling height is greater than feet. See our downrod sizing guide to determine which length you will need for your ceiling height.

A sloped application is intended for room where the ceiling slants at 3degrees or higher. The fan installs into the ceiling with the use of an adapter, like this Modern Fan sloped ceiling adapter.

Lastly, look for a ceiling fan with a blade span that matches the room’s square footage and height. If you choose a fan that is too small for the space, it will struggle to move air. If you choose a fan that is too large for the space, not only will be off putting, but it will waste too much energy.

Sizing Tips: Here are some additional dimensions to consider when you buy a ceiling fan a new ceiling fan.

CEILING FAN LIGHTS

To add lighting or not to add lighting, that is the question. Choosing a ceiling fan with lighting is a matter of personal preference. If you plan to install the fan in a space with good natural lighting or sufficient light fixtures, buy a ceiling fan without a light kit.

If the space could use a boost of general lighting, choose a ceiling fan with a light kit. Today’s fans offer a range of lighting sources, including halogen, fluorescent, and LEDs.

Fluorescent

Fluorescent light sources use 7percent less energy than incandescent light sources and have an average lifespan of 10,000 hours. Ceiling fans with CFL bulbs emit cool or warm lighting.

LED light sources consume very little energy and have an average lifespan of 50,000 hours. These ceiling fans with energy-efficient bulbs emit cool or warm lighting.

Antique Ceiling Fan Designs

Antique and vintage style ceiling fans complement traditional and vintage home decors. They often feature decorative filigree and scrollwork on the motor housing and blade brackets. Many light kits include a warm globe light. To achieve a vintage-inspired look, buy a ceiling fan that features an antique-style and pair it with American Empire furniture, floral prints and textiles, and warm brass and copper finishes. A warm pastel palette ties the space together.

Contemporary Ceiling Fans

Contemporary ceiling fans are a great addition to any modern and transitional space. The modern style ceiling fans feature clean lines, smooth metallic finishes, and minimal adornment. Buy a ceiling fan with a contemporary feel and pair it with casual contemporary furniture (avoid wood carving and adornments), natural textiles such as cotton, linen or wool, and chrome, nickel or stainless steel hardware. A bold color palette and geometric accents bring the look together.

Rustic Ceiling Fans

Rustic ceiling fans pair well with country, mission and western interiors. These rustic-inspired ceiling fans feature straight lines and dark wood finishes with homespun accents. To achieve this look, buy a ceiling fan with a rustic look and pair it with lodge-style furniture, checkered or striped prints, handmade accents, such as baskets, carved wooden bowls, and pottery, and hand-forged metal accents. Soft, muted colors, rough hewn wood and hand-forged metal accents round out this look.

Tropical Ceiling fans

Tropical ceiling fans complement coastal, island, and nautical home interiors. The island-inspired fans feature bamboo, natural palm leaf, and rattan blades with distressed wood finishes. To achieve this look, buy a ceiling fan with a tropical feel and pair it with rattan furniture, bright colors and natural patterns, tropical flowers and plants, and handcrafted items.

CEILING FAN EFFICIENCY & AIRFLOW

The motor is the heart of any ceiling fan, and it determines the airflow and efficiency of your ceiling fan. You don’t have to have to be an electrical engineer to understand a fan motor, but it’s the most important part of any fan. Consider the factors below the next time you buy a ceiling fan:

High Airflow

High airflow ceiling fans circulate more air and consume less energy than standard fans. These fans are ideal for garages, warehouses, and outdoor spaces, such as your patio and porch. When you buy a ceiling fan with high airflow you get an added bonus: high-airflow fans are known to drive away mosquitoes and other backyard pests.

Ceiling Fans with Remote Control

The handheld remote control offers the most convenience of all the fan control options. The lightweight and portable control operated within a 30 to 50-foot range, making it ideal for high ceiling fans and hard to reach places. Handheld remote control ceiling fans are also ideal for bedrooms.

Wall Control

The fan speed wall control option allows you to operate the fan speed, direction and lighting with the press of a button. The stationary remote has a range up to 40 feet, making it ideal for families with kids. A wall control is ideal for kitchens, dining rooms, living rooms and multipurpose rooms.

Three Track Lighting Standards

Other track options to consider include TECH Lighting and Bruck Lighting. Bear in mind once you buy a proprietary system, you are restricted to track light fixtures made by the same company. To avoid problems, we recommend you pick one of the standards—H, J, or L—and stick with it.

Other Features

Feel free to ask us any questions. You can find general track lighting installation instructions on the Internet at sites such as this one; however, we cannot be responsible for the accuracy of their content. If in doubt, we always recommend you consult a qualified electrician.

Page 5:Accessories

Philips makes a wide number of smart LED lights that offer a mix of colors and  effects that you can control remotely. Plus, LEDs last much longer than other types of lights, and consume less energy, too. Philips Hue lights also integrate with

Bulbs and Lightstrips

You can expand your lighting options through a number of different Philips Hue bulbs. These include everything from plain white bulbs to multicolored lightstrips and other bulbs that fit smaller sockets. Just remember you’ll have to connect them to your bridge first.

Light Fixtures

While limited to a few options, Philips light fixtures have the bulbs built directly into them. That means that when the LEDs burn out—which should be at least years, if not more—you’ll have to replace the entire fixture. These also require a bridge (sold separately) to control them via Philips’ app.

Terminology

When buying traditional incandescent light bulbs, all we needed to pay attention to was the bulb shape, wattage which indicated the brightness of the bulb and the screw base size to make sure it fits into the lamp.

With CFL’s came the option of choosing the light appearance described mostly as soft white, bright white and daylight. Soft white resembles the warm tone of an incandescent bulb whereas bright and daylight being more crisp and cooler with a blueish appearance.

When using LED’s it is important to understand three concepts

After all, LED products are still more expensive than comparable incandescent products and they will be a much longer lasting appliance, so we want to make sure we are buying the right product for the job.

Brightness

First off, we have to let go of the misconception that wattage equals brightness. While for incandescent bulbs wattage and brightness had a direct correlation, this is not true for LED products and since LED’s consume much less power (Watts), it’s impossible to compare brightness of an incandescent and an LED bulb based on wattage.

So the only factor to pay attention to when looking for brightness of an LED light is Lumens. Lumen is the unit of measure for brightness and tells us how much light a particular lighting product emits.

For reference, a typical incandescent 60 W bulb emits approximately 800 lumens.

Light Appearance

The color appearance or correlated color temperature (CCT) of light is measured in kelvin (K). When we want to know if a lighting fixture or bulb creates a warmer or crisper, cooler light we need to look for the kelvin number. The lower the number, the warmer the light will be and the higher the number the more cool and blue the light will appear. A typical incandescent bulb has a color temperature between 2700K and 3000K. The sun at noon on a clear day produces a light of approximately 5500K.

People often complain about the cool, sterile light appearance of CFL bulbs compared to incandescent bulbs. The issue here is that they chose a high kelvin, cool color temperature instead of a warmer color temperature.

Color Accuracy

Have you ever been to a store and thought that you are color blind, because you couldn’t quite make out if the piece of clothing you were looking at was a dark green or blue? If so, then you experienced poor color rendering by the light fixture inside that store.

Light sources differ in their ability to display the colors of objects “correctly”. And by correctly we mean compared to a natural light source like the sun or an incandescent bulb.

The color rendering is expressed as the Color Rendering Index or short CRI. The scale goes from 0 to 100. A 2700K incandescent light bulb has a CRI of 100.

A value of above 80 is with current LED technology considered a good CRI and will be sufficient for most applications. However, for some areas, better color rendering of 90 or above can be desirable, we explain that in the next section.

Choosing the right light for different light functions and areas in your home  Functions of Light

Lighting is typically categorized in ambient, task, accent and decorative lighting. Each category provides a different purpose. When planning the light for a home, it is helpful to understand how these different light levels can complement each other.

Ambient Lighting

Ambient (or general) lighting provides a uniform amount of lighting throughout an area or room for general vision and orientation.

Recessed down lights, cove lighting or pendant-hung fixtures are typical examples for ambient lighting.

Accent Lighting

It’s used to highlight objects like works of art, architectural features or plants, by creating contrast in brightness. This is often achieved using recessed or surface mount adjustable fixtures or track lighting, wall grazing and wall washing.

Color Temperatures for Ambient Light

The ambient lighting in a room is typically the main source of light and therefore a key element in setting the overall mood and ambience for a room.

Warm white lighting fixtures are often preferred in living rooms and bedrooms to create a cozy atmosphere.

The kelvin numbers offered for LED lights are typically 2700K and 3000K. These warm white lights are a good choice to compliment earthy tones and wood furniture.

If more than one type of ambient light is installed, e.g. down lights and cove lighting, choose the same color temperature for both to ensure an even, harmonic effect.

Though many people seem to prefer warm white, rooms that are decorated with light colored furniture and crisper colors, like white, blue and light grey e.g. in a modern kitchen, can benefit from a more neutral, cooler light.

Lighting with kelvin numbers in the range from 3500K to 4000K are considered neutral white and accentuate lighter colors better than warm white lights.

In addition, studies show that neutral and cool white light has an energizing effect on people, and is therefore are a good choice for home offices and studies.

Since neutral and cool white light creates better contrast than warm white, they are also a good choice for the main ambient light in bathrooms. The cooler light will provide a more realistic idea on what we look like in the real world. Look for kelvin numbers between 4000K and 5000K for your main ambient bathroom fixture.

If the bathroom features a bathtub and you want to be able to create a warm atmosphere as well, consider using an additional layer of light, e.g. a wall sconce with a warm white light in the range of 2700K that can be switched separately from the main light.

Dimming

Dimming is an important feature of ambient and task lighting. It enables us to set the light level to create the desired atmosphere in an area or create the ideal brightness for a task. In addition, dimming provides energy savings by reducing the electric load of a light fixture.

As opposed to a standard incandescent lamp, not all LED fixtures are built to be dimmable, it is therefore important to look at the product label and ensure that the fixture is marked as dimmable.

When making the switch to LED, be prepared to also change out your dimmer switches. Most dimmers were built for incandescent, bulbs, however LED’s are based on a very different technology and therefore these two don’t necessarily work well together. It’s like trying to connect your old rotary phone to your digital phone outlet.

Most manufacturers provide a compatibility list that shows dimmer manufacturers and models that have been tested and are compatible with the LED fixture.

To ensure an optimal lighting experience, it’s highly recommended to stick to the manufacturer’s recommendations. Using incompatible dimmers can lead to flickering lights or insufficient dimming levels.

Installation

Though most LED lighting fixtures are considered low-voltage, that means they either have a transformer build in or require an external transformer, the good news is, it is not necessary to rewire a house to use LED’s. All the wiring that is commonly used in houses is perfectly fine for use with LEDs.

Many LED fixtures have a transformer already built in and can be connected to a standard electrical outlet. Some LED products, i.e. LED strip lights, require an external power supply. These come in two formats, either with an AC cord attached, similar to a laptop power supply or they need to be connected to an outlet.

It is recommended to have a licensed electrician perform any installation that requires electrical connections to the line voltage.

Do pay attention to the product label, it will indicate if a power supply is required or not.

Know the lighting lingo

Know the lightbulb basics: (Quartz/Incandescent) Tungsten-Halogen – These compact light sources are filled with halogen gas, making for a longer bulb life and brighter, whiter, warmer light. Available in both line-voltage (120 volts) and low-voltage (1volts), some of the most popular halogen bulbs are:

Light Emitting Diode (LED) bulbs are the most recent addition to the residential bulb market. These lamps use 80% less energy than incandescent and last up to 50 times longer.  Excellent for task lighting, night-lights, and outdoor applications, they are more expensive than most lamps, but their durability, long life, and energy-efficiency will save you money in the long run.

Voltage

As with most home lighting, there are two basic types of track lighting systems: line voltage and low voltage. Line-voltage systems use the standard electrical wires and current in the home, which provides 120 volts to the fixtures. These type of track lighting installations tend to use incandescent spot lights or flood lights and have the largest light fixtures. Low-voltage systems have a small transformer built in which takes the current down to 1volts, allowing the system to use a greater variety of bulbs and light fixtures; often much smaller than line voltage lighting, but equally as bright. Low-voltage track lighting bulbs also last longer, getting about 2-3,000 hours versus the 700 to 1,000 hours a line-voltage bulb will get. In the case of low-voltage LED systems, the lights can last an impressive 10,000 to 100,000 hours.

Colour and colour temperature

Warm white, cool light, daylight: choosing a ‘simple’ white lightbulb can be more complicated than it seems.

The colour temperature of a bulb makes a big difference to the kind of light it emits and is denoted by a 4-digit number followed by the letter ‘K’ (which stands for Kelvin).

The colour temperature of most bulbs is between 2000K-6500K. A 2000K bulb would give off a very warm, yellow light, suitable for cosy living rooms or bedrooms, while a 6500K one would be what is known as a ‘Daylight’ bulb, as it is supposed to recreate exactly that.

If you’re shopping for a warm white lightbulb for the home, look for anything around 2500-3000K, while anything over 4000K would give you a nice cool light.

Alternatively, you can find a wide variety of coloured or colour-changing lightbulbs. These will be labelled quite clearly with their colour. ‘RGB’ bulbs allow you to pick from a variety of different colours.

Watts and lumens

Do not use a bulb’s wattage to determine its brightness.

The ‘lumens’ rating gives a more accurate indication of how bright a lightbulb is. This is especially important when choosing LED lightbulbs as they can give out the same brightness as an incandescent bulb using much less power. For example, an LED lightbulb that uses only watts (W) of power emits around the same brightness as a traditional 50W bulb (see to find out how we know this).

Bulbs for general household use will typically have a lumens rating (lm) somewhere between 300-500lm. The lumen output of golfball and candle bulbs may be lower, as they’re designed for use in smaller lamps, while high-powered outdoor floodlights could emit in excess of 20,000 lumens.

The wattage of a bulb should still be taken into consideration to make sure it’s compatible with your fittings. The low wattage of LED lightbulbs gives you a lot more flexibility, but you should still not exceed the stated wattage of any light fixture.

If you’re still not sure about the difference between watts and lumens, find out more

Bulb life

LED lightbulbs are incredibly long lasting compared to their incandescent counterparts. The average rated life of a product will tell you roughly how many hours life you should get out of it before it fails. Importantly, though, don’t mix the rated life up with the manufacturer’s warranty period, as the two may not always be the same.

If an LED bulb fails within its manufacturer’s warranty period, you are entitled to a replacement bulb. If it fails outside of this period, you are not, even if the bulb has not reached the average rated life stated on the product.

The manufacturer’s warranty should be stated clearly on any product. Contact us for help if it is not.

Other technical details

The following points aren’t the most important factors in buying a lightbulb, but may help you find the perfect one for your needs.

If you’re buying spotlights, the beam angle may be something to think about. Measured in degrees, the beam angle of a light determines how wide or how narrow the beam of light is that the bulb emits. A 40° beam angle, for instance, would have a very narrow, focused beam suited to retails displays, while a 100 degree beam angle would cast a wider light more suitable for lighting corridors or larger rooms.

Some lightbulbs come with a CRI (Colour Rendering Index) rating. This tells you how well a bulb reproduces the colours of the environment around it. High CRi bulbs are useful for photography studios, where capturing the natural colour of objects is really important. If you’re just buying a bulb for general use in the home, this is not something you need to worry too much about.

Small kitchens

Wren Kitchens Limited, The Nest, Falkland Way, Barton-upon-Humber, DN15RL (COMPANY REGISTERED NUMBER 06799478) act as a credit intermediary for a single lender, Clydesdale Financial Services Limited, trading as Barclays Partner Finance and can only offer you loans provided by them.

Barclays Partner Finance is a trading name of Clydesdale Financial Services Limited a wholly owned subsidiary of Barclays Bank PLC. Clydesdale Financial Services Limited is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (Financial Services Register number: 311753). Registered in England. Registered No. 290172Registered office: Churchill Place, London E15HP.

LED Lighting for Bedroom Use

In our bedrooms, most of us want the atmosphere to be relaxed, calm, and peaceful. Avoiding blue light waves in the bedroom will keep your circadian rhythm from confusing the light in your bedroom with the natural light outside. This allows your brain to produce the melatonin needed for a comfortable sleep. Are you a nighttime reader? If you have a bedside reading lamp or plan on buying one, soft blue or neutral tones are better for reading specific fixtures, since the cool-white color creates a high contrast with the page.

Suggested Total Brightness Level – 1,500 to 4,000 Lumens

LED Lighting for Home Office Use

When lighting a home office, we want to make sure that the lights are maximizing our ability to be productive in the space provided. Putting cool-white lights in the office that mimic daylight will increase serotonin production keeping you focused, alert, and energized. Make sure to choose a place that won’t create unwanted glares on your computer screen. You may also want to consider LED Desk Lamps which offer great task lighting and the ability to switch color temperature on demand.

LED Lighting for Dining Room Use

When eating a nice meal with the family or guests, we don’t want the lighting to be overly bright and obnoxious, and we certainly don’t want it to be so dim that we’re dozing off. Whether it’s an afternoon brunch or a late dinner, a dimmable overhead fixtures allow for that perfect brightness at any time of day. We recommend soft to neutral tones for the dining room that create the perfect ambiance. Also, consider LED bulbs for chandelier fixtures that are commonly used in a dining room, LED chandelier bulbs now offer beautiful color and light output.

Suggested Total Brightness Level – 3,000 to 6,000 Lumens Suggested Color Temperature: 2200-3000K

LED Lighting for Kitchen Use

The kitchen is in essence a workspace. Many of us start our mornings in the kitchen, so those blue-light emitting bulbs over the counters will help make us alert and awake while prepping breakfast. If you also have a table in your kitchen, a dimmable overhead fixture with a warmer color temperature can create a nice ambiance to balance out the brighter blue lights over the kitchen counters. Kitchens also can take advantage of recessed overhead lighting which can benefit from LED BR Bulbs or Recessed Retrofit Kits.

Suggested Total Brightness Level – 4,000 to 8,000 Lumens Suggested Color Temperature: 2700-5000K

LED Lighting for Bathroom Use

Before we go to school or work, most of us get ready by looking in the bathroom mirror. Ideally, we want the lighting to come from around the mirror rather than on the ceiling. Using bright lights will ensure we don’t miss a spot shaving or mess up our makeup. Since many of us start the day with a shower, putting a high output surface mount retrofit fixture in the shower fixture is a great way to start waking up before tackling the day ahead. Use larger globe style bulbs to illuminate common fixtures places above and or around the mirror.

Suggested Total Brightness Level – 4,000 to 8,000 Lumens Suggested Color Temperature: 3000-5000K

Features of a mountain bike light

Lamp body (head unit): This houses the LEDs, the lens in front, the reflectors behind, the circuitry that makes it all work and the fins or ribs that radiate away as much heat as possible.

LEDs: Most lights now use LEDs (light emitting diodes), because they produce more light for less power than a conventional bulb and are far less fragile than HID lamps. Technological advances mean performance has leapt forward in the past few years and each new season brings significant upgrades.

Optics: The reflector and lens in front affect how the light is thrown down the trail. Focused spot beams are great for seeing a long way for a given output; wide flood beams give good peripheral vision.

Mount/bracket: How you attach the light to your bike. Most mounts use clips and spacers but O-rings are a great simple solution. If you are thinking of using a helmet mounted light, you need a lamp that’s light enough to be comfortable and secure on your lid, rather than a neck snapper. You’ll need an extension cable and helmet mount too, so check if that’s included or an optional extra.

Battery: The bit that powers the light. Lighter, tougher, far more random charge resistant lithium ion (Li-Ion) chargeable batteries have revolutionised mountain bike lighting compared with older lead acid and NiMH batteries — but battery and lamp efficiencies still vary dramatically. Most brands sell extra batteries (often at a discount if bought with the light) so you can always swap halfway. Check your batteries are properly prepared for maximum performance (this should be in the instructions) and take a back-up until you know you can rely on their run times.

Switchgear: The switch not only turns the light on, but also lets you change power output levels. It needs to be easy to operate while riding, even with gloves on, but hard to operate accidentally. Many lights now use backlit switches that double as mode and/or run time indicators using traffic-light-style colour changes. Switchgears now range from a simple push button sequential mode switch with low battery warning light to wireless bar-mounted units or switches that can also change the different output levels and menus.

Head or bars

Most lights come with both bar and helmet mounting options. Which is better comes down to personal preference, but here are the pros and cons of each.

The result — it’s a draw! In reality the best solution is to use helmet and bar-mounted lights, even if you have to buy lower powered units to afford both. It also means you have a backup should one battery die.

Jargon buster

Amp-hour — A measurement of battery capacity. The bigger the capacity, the longer your lights will run. You need to divide this value by the amperage the light operates at in order to get the theoretical run time

Bag — A cloth pack that holds the battery onto the bike’s frame

Bar mount — Light bracket that fits around oversize (31.8mm) and/or older 1in (25.4mm) diameter handlebars

Battery cell — The single units that wire together to create a battery pack

Bottle — Plastic water bottle converted to hold a large capacity battery

How we test mountain bike lights

Being stuck on a wet winter’s night, miles from anywhere with a failed light or everything suddenly going pitch black halfway down a technical descent is a really serious matter. That’s why we take our lights testing extremely seriously.

There’s no substitute for time on trail in all weathers to find out this crucial stuff — and we’re not just talking about lights used in the past few months. We also reference the sets we’ve run long-term to get in-depth, worst case use feedback that’s directly relevant to the riding you do.

Product reviewer Guy Kesteven tests run times and cooling

The science side

As is often the case with mountain biking, the scientific part of the testing is the easiest bit. Lights (lamp body plus handlebar bracket) and batteries are weighed on our scales.

We then measure the useful maximum power run time (to when the output fades and low battery warning lights come on) with pre-conditioned (used and recharged) batteries in the highest power setting on an air cooled rig to mimic the cooling effect of riding at night. We also measure the maximum casing heat of the lights with a thermal probe to see if any get dangerously hot.

Light output is calculated using a lux (a measurement of one lumen per square metre) calibrated industrial light meter placed 5m from the lamp in a blacked out workshop. (If the light has more than one beam or head unit we measure both separately and their combined output.)

This method does favour spot beams over flood beams, but it’s still a more trail translatable measurement than the lumen potential of LEDs. The coverage, density and other specific characteristics of the beam are often more important than the peak brightness though, so we also take beam photos to make it easier to compare the lights.

The practical side

It’s the feedback we get from real world usage that really sorts out often very similar lamps in terms of trail performance. When it comes to our test conditions we’re talking serious sorties, often two or three times a week all year round in every trail condition imaginable. Baked hard river bed runs that’ll shake a poor bracket or fragile circuit board apart in seconds or leave a badly bagged battery hanging by its lead; sub-zero tundra trudges that freeze a battery to horribly low maximum power run times; drownings in downpours and hip-deep bog crashes.

Most of our lights have seen it all and, if the most recent versions have only been hammered through summer, we’ve certainly put the models preceding them through the most testing ride schedule possible. Repeated group riding, bike switching, recharging and battery flattening gives us the perfect comparative testing cluster too, so any failures or fading is immediately obvious rather than going unnoticed in isolation.

In other words, if a light scores well, you know it’s gone through some proper optical and electrical purgatory to prove itself. For that reason, for all of our latest lights testing we’ve deliberately stuck with established (at least a year old) lights manufacturers to ensure anything we recommend is a fully supported product.

Light output is calculated using a lux calibrated industrial light meter placed 5m from the lamp in a blacked out workshop

 

 

 

 

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Final Word

First of all thanks for reading my article to the end! I hope you find my reviews listed here useful and that it allows you to make a proper comparison of what is best to fit your needs and budget. Don’t be afraid to try more than one product if your first pick doesn’t do the trick.

Most important, have fun and choose your Track Lighting Accessories wisely! Good luck!

So, TOP3 of Track Lighting Accessories

 

 

Questions? Leave a comment below!

Chatting about Track Lighting Accessories is my passion! Leave me a question in the comments, I answer each and every one and would love to get to know you better!



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