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Top Of The Best Specialty Light Bulbs Reviewed In 2018

Last Updated November 1, 2018
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Adrian HoffmanHi! My name is Reginald Meyer. After putting in 50+ hours of research and testing, I made a list of the best Specialty Light Bulbs of 2018 and explained their differences and advantages.

In this article, I will be categorizing the items according to their functions and most typical features. I hope that my Top 10 list will provide you great options in buying the right fit for you.

 

 

Feel free to explore the podium, click on the pictures to find out more.

 

 

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You must visit the page of sales. Here is the link. If you don’t care about which brand is better, then you can choose the Specialty Light Bulbs by the price and buy from the one who will offer the greatest discount.

 

 

№1 – Bioluz LED A19 6w (40 Watt Equivalent) ECO Series Soft White (2700K) Light Bulbs 6-Pack

 
Bioluz LED A19 6w (40 Watt Equivalent) ECO Series Soft White (2700K) Light Bulbs 6-Pack
Pros
40 watt equivalent using only 6 watts; 450 Lumens
Excellent in all lamps and fixtures; beautiful when on or off
2700K color temperature matches the color of existing incandescents
 

 

№2 – G4 Halogen Light Bulbs, 20W Bin-Pin(2pin)12 Volts JC Type,Clear bulb(Pack of 10)

 
G4 Halogen Light Bulbs, 20W Bin-Pin(2pin)12 Volts JC Type,Clear bulb(Pack of 10)
Pros
Excellent performance. This tiny shaped glass clean bulb has a high brightness and good lighting.
Stable long life. Approx. 2,000hrs.
Wide usage. Easily used at home, office, restaurants, stores and so on.
 

 

№3 – 12Vmonster 10 Pack g8 20watt 120v halogen light bulbs JCD Type 110v 130v 20w t4 G8 120 volt

 
12Vmonster 10 Pack g8 20watt 120v halogen light bulbs JCD Type 110v 130v 20w t4 G8 120 volt
Pros
33mm length / 1.25 inch length ********** PACK OF 10 **********
120 Volt 20 Watt halogen replacements 110 volt 130 volt 110v 120v 130v
Bi Pin G8 fitting
 

 

Pros & Cons of LED Light

LED stands for light emitting diode, which are semiconductors that produce light when charged. LED bulbs have an average lifespan of over 50,000 hours, compared to a little over 1,000 for conventional incandescent bulbs. As a LED ages, the amount of light it gives off dissipates over time. 

Pros & Cons of CFL Light

CFL stands for compact fluorescent lighting, which is simply a smaller version of a fluorescent tube. CFL bulbs contain a mercury vapor that lights when it is energized. Because CFLs contain mercury, they must be disposed of carefully, at designated drop-off site (Home Depot, Lowes, recycling centers, etc). An average CFL bulb should last 7,000 hours.

Pros & Cons of Incandescent Light

Incandescent light is an electric process that produces light with a wire filament that is heated to a high temperature by an electric current which runs through it. This is the type of lighting which was the standard in homes up until the 1990’s.  Due to its poor energy efficiency, it is being replaced with the newer technology of LED and CFL bulbs. Incandescent bulbs last roughly 1,000 hours.

Pros & Cons of Halogen Light

Similar to incandescent light bulbs, halogen bulbs use a similar electric-filament technology with one important difference; with incandescents the filament degrades via evaporation over time whereas, with halogens, filament evaporation is prevented by a chemical process that redeposits metal vapor onto the filament, thereby extending its life. Halogen bulbs have a lifespan of roughly 3,000 hours.

Color Temperature & Lighting  Color temperature is a characteristic of visible light. The temperature of light refers to its warmness or coolness, or hue. This temperature is measured using the Kelvin scale, which for most use ranges from 2,700°-7,500°K. Incandescent and halogen lighting are the most limited in the temperature range at 2,700°-3,000°K. LED and CFL have each expanded their color range to now offering warmer options. Most task lighting, however, benefits from cooler lighting options which include LED, full spectrum, and CFL.

Understanding Lumens & Brightness  is a measurement of light output from a lamp, often called a tube or a bulb. All lamps are rated in lumens. For example, a 100-watt incandescent lamp produces about 1,600 lumens. 

The distribution of light on a flat surface is called its  illumination  and is measured in footcandles. A footcandle of illumination is a lumen of light spread over a one square foot area.

The illumination needed varies according to the difficulty of a visual task. Ideal illumination is the minimum footcandles necessary to allow you to perform a task comfortably and efficiently without eyestrain or fatigue. According to the Illuminating Engineering Society, illumination of 30 to 50 footcandles is needed for most home and office work. Intricate and lengthy visual tasks — like sewing — require 200 to 500 footcandles.

1,000-1,400 Lumens is a commonly accepted range for most applications of task lighting. An average of 50 Lumens per square foot is a common measure. efficacy. Efficacy is the ratio of light output from a lamp to the electric power it uses and is measured in lumens per watt.

Demystifying LED Light

When comparing the raw lumen output of traditional lamps with the lumen output of many LED lamps, it may seem that LEDs deliver less light than the conventional counterparts. These comparisons, however, are inaccurate and misleading, since they fail to account for the amount of wasted light in conventional lighting. 

Therefore, lumen output is a poor measure of the suitability of a lamp for a given task. The better measure is delivered light — how much light a fixture delivers to a surface, as measured in lux (lx) or footcandles (fc). You can make comparisons between conventional and LED lighting fixtures on the basis of delivered light, as it measures how much of a light source’s raw lumen output reaches a surface or area you are lighting. 

Determining the amount of a conventional lamp’s raw lumen output reaches as area, you must discount any light lost in the fixture housing (at times over 30%), as well as the light lost as a result of shading, lensing, and filtering. Since incandescent and fluorescent lamps often emit light in many directions, you must also discount any light cast away from the target area. 

Reading area or den

The reading area should have a bright task lamp. A bright desk lamp can prevent eye strain which is helpful in preventing eye damage in the long run. With bright task lamps in the reading area, you can keep headaches away. Thus, you will surely enjoy reading as well as other activities like writing letters or completing puzzles.

Kitchen

Your kitchen is another part of the home that requires task lighting. The dangerous nature of the activities you do in your kitchen is reason enough to get additional task lighting. More importantly, you need enough light to read recipes and to see the ingredients as they cook as well as other practical things. For kitchens, common task lighting fixtures are under cabinet lights that provide extra illumination to supplement the ambient light.

Tand CFL 

TFluorescent grow light fixtures for indoor gardening are all-in-one systems. This means no external ballast is needed and they have built in reflectors. In most cases they will come with bulbs installed and may even offer a grow or bloom version.

CFL grow lights for indoor gardening are usually either smaller 25w medium base socket (standard light socket) or 125w CFLs. Be sure to purchase industry specific lighting and not just standard lighting found in supply stores. Indoor gardening industry CFLs are self-ballasted, meaning they screw into a CFL reflector and are ready to go. Most cheap 125w CFLs found at general lighting supply stores have a non-ballasted bulb because they are designed for outdoor lighting fixtures with a built-in ballast.

The trade-off for the simplicity and lack of heat comes in the form of less usable plant growth specific light and less light penetration. Many growers use fluorescent lights for veg growth only or as supplemental lighting in the flowering stage. It can produce lackluster results as the primary light source during the bloom stage due to the lack of light penetration. If you use fluorescents for the flowering stage, a canopy growing method like a screen of green should also be used. This helps maximize the fluorescent lighting and reduces the need for penetrating light.

Dual Arc Lamps

Dual arc lamps are another bulb type for HID lighting. While a dual arc lamp is technically a HPS lamp, dual arc lamps contain both bulb type components and emit a more natural, fuller light spectrum. For example, a 1000W dual arc lamp contains a 600W HPS component and 400W MH component.

Vegetative Stage

The vegetative stage of plant growth is time to have more intense light. Fluorescents are still commonly used, though with larger fixtures and more bulbs. LEDs are great for the vegetative stage too and even the older; low-technology LEDs do a decent job during this stage. Many growers have moved their older LEDs that aren’t well suited for the flowering stage to their vegetative room and experienced good results. HID Metal Halide grow lights have been the gold standard for the vegetative stage for the past few decades. They produce good results and can be used with larger plants that less intense lights like fluorescents. Ceramic Metal Halide is becoming popular and is praised for its performance during the vegetative stage of plant growth well.

Bloom Stage

HID lighting, specifically HPS grow lights, is the preferred bloom lighting for most grow rooms. Their lower initial cost and consistently good results make them ideal for most growers. High-end bulbs produce even better and the use of specialty bulbs, like finishing spectrum bulbs, can boost results even more by adding more of the frosty quality that wide/multi-spectrum lights like LEDs offer. Some growers are also using Ceramic Metal Halide for their bloom grows, though they perform better as vegetative stage lights than bloom.

There is no clear winner in our recommendation as there are many trade-offs and differences, with some being the preference of the grower and their style. T5s are our least favorite for this stage. But if they are used properly with a canopy scrog, they can provide good results. Due to the ease and affordability T5s can be a good option, just be sure to grow it right.

Color temperature

After lumens, the next concept you’ll want to understand is color temperature. Measured on the Kelvin scale, color temperature isn’t really a measure of heat. Instead, it’s a measure of the color that a light source produces, ranging from yellow on the low end of the scale to bluish on the high end, with whitish light in the middle.

An easy way to keep track of color temperature is to think of a flame: it starts out yellow and orange, but when it gets really hot, it turns blue. You could also think of color temperature in terms of the sun — low, yellowy color temperatures mimic the tone of light at sunrise or sunset, while hotter, more bluish-white color temperatures are more akin to daylight (sure enough, bulbs with color temperatures like these are commonly called “daylight” bulbs). This is also why a lot of people prefer high color temperatures during the day and lower color temperatures in the morning and evening.

Generally speaking, incandescents sit at the bottom of the scale with their yellow light, while CFLs and LEDs have long been thought to tend toward the high, bluish end of the spectrum. This has been a steady complaint about new lighting alternatives, as many people prefer the warm, familiar, low color temperature of incandescents. Manufacturers are listening, though, and in this case they heard consumers loud and clear, with more and more low-color-temperature CFL and LED options hitting the shelves. Don’t believe me? Take another look at those two paper lamps in the picture above, because they’re both CFL bulbs — from the same manufacturer, no less.

Sylvania often color codes its packaging. Blue indicates a hot, bluish color temperature, while the lighter shade indicates a white, more neutral light.

Bulb shape

As you’re probably aware, light bulbs come in a fairly wide variety of shapes. Sure, it’s easy enough to tell a hardware store clerk that you want “one of those flamey-looking lights,” or “just a normal ol’ bulby light bulb,” but knowing the actual nomenclature might save you some time.

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Are pricey candelabra LEDs a smart upgrade for your chandelier?

Let’s start with the base of the bulb, the part that screws in. In the US, the most common shape by far is E26, with the “E” standing for Edison and the “26” referring to the diameter of the base in millimeters. You might also see E2bulbs from time to time, which is the European standard. Those should still fit into common American fixtures, but keep in mind that voltage ratings are different in the two regions, with American bulbs rated for 120 volts compared to 220-240 volts in Europe. For smaller sockets, like you might find with a candelabra, you’ll want to look for an E1base.

As for the bulb itself, the typical shape that you’re probably used to is an A1bulb. Increase that number to A2or A23, and you’ve got the same shape, but bigger. Bulbs made to resemble flames are F-shaped, which is easy enough to remember, as are globes, which go by the letter G. If it’s a floodlight you want, you’ll want to look for “BR” (bulging reflector) or “PAR” (parabolic aluminized reflector). Those bulbs are designed to throw all their light in one direction only, which makes them useful for spot lighting, overhead lighting and the headlights in your car.

Your automated-lighting options

It used to be that if you wanted your lights to turn on and off automatically, then you had to rely on a cheap wall socket timer, the kind you might use to control a Christmas tree. These days, with a modest boom in smart lighting currently under way, it’s easier than ever to dive into the sort of advanced automation controls that can make any home feel modern and futuristic. Use the right devices, and you’ll be able to control your lights in all sorts of creative ways, and make your life a little bit easier in the process.

The most obvious way to get started with smart lighting is with the bulbs themselves. You’ve got plenty of intelligent options from brands both big and small, and to find the one that’s best for you, you’re going to need to understand what sets them apart.

Connect with these 3IFTTT-friendly smart devices (pictures)

The first thing to look at is how the bulbs communicate with you. Some offer direct connections with your smart phone via Bluetooth or Wi-Fi, which makes setup as simple as screwing the thing in and following in-app pairing instructions.

Others transmit using a distinct frequency like ZigBee or Z-Wave. Bulbs like those might be a better fit for bigger smart home setups, as it’s typically a little easier to sync them up with things like motion detectors and smart locks. Setup can be slightly more advanced, as you’ll need a separate hub or gateway device capable of translating that distinct frequency into a Wi-Fi signal your router can comprehend.

Some smart bulbs come with their own gateway. Others, like the Cree Connected LED, require a third-party control device, like the Wink Hub.

Color control

If you’re looking for a little more color in your life, then be sure and take a look at a product like the Philips Hue Starter Kit. Aside from being fully automatable via a mobile app and control hub, the Hue LED bulbs are capable of on-demand color changes. Just pull out your phone, select one of millions of possible shades, and the light will match it. And if you’re into voice control, Hue bulbs hit the compatibility trifecta — they’ll work with Siri, Alexa, and the Google Assistant.

Because Philips opened its lighting controls to third-party developers, you’ll also find lots of fun novelty uses for Hue bulbs, like changing the color of your lights in rhythm with whatever music you’re playing. There’s even an app that’ll sync your Hue lights up with certain TV programming.

Hue lights are also directly compatible with the popular web service IFTTT, with recipes already available that will change the color of your lights to match the weather, or to signal a touchdown from your favorite football team, or even to indicate when your stocks are doing well.

Doug Mahoney

After spending over 60 hours researching Christmas lights, interviewing experts, and testing 20 strands of lights side by side, we’ve found that GE’s Energy Smart Colorite LED Miniature Lights (available in multicolor strands of 50 bulbs or 100 bulbs and in warm white strands of 50 bulbs or 100 bulbs) are the best all-around indoor Christmas lights. This is the third year we’ve named these GE lights as our pick, and we can’t find any lights that match their color quality and their ready availability at Home Depot.

We’re working on an update for the holiday season, and we plan to add our thoughts on smartphone-app light sets such as Home Depot’s AppLights. For now, we’re confident that our current picks, all of which are currently in stock, remain the best lights for most people.

How we picked and tested

We concentrated our research and testing strictly on nonblinking miniature lights, the traditional, small, stranded Christmas lights with a clear or semiclear bulb and a candle shape.

An article at DIY Network says that even though larger bulbs are growing in popularity, “mini lights have been by far the most popular during the past decade.” They’re the standard, and we wanted to focus on the lights that most people will be using, rather than those with a lesser following. Still, we do have some thoughts on the larger-bulb lights, and on other bulb sizes that didn’t make the cut. During our research, we also found that blinking lights are a very small minority of available lights, so we stayed with the type that remains lit at all times.

Once we dug into our options, we soon realized that our recommended lights would be fully rectified LEDs and not traditional incandescents. As Northern Seasonal’s Ben Orr, the lighting installer, told us, “LED lights allow you to do more with less.” They’re more durable, they’re safer, and you can connect together a much higher number of strands without any risk of tripping a breaker or a GFCI outlet. They also just plain ol’ last longer and use a fraction of the electricity that incandescents use.

In an article on the Christmas Designers website, Jason Woodward writes that “the benefits offered by LEDs are almost as significant as the benefits that incandescents provided over candles.” There’s no question that LEDs cost more than incandescents (they’re at least twice the price), but we believe that the long-term benefits are worth that added cost.

Some LEDs are better than others, however. All LED Christmas lights blink on and off many times per second, like a fluorescent light. The ones that are fully rectified, or full-wave, light up at a rate of 120 times per second, which is faster than the eye can detect. Lights that are known as half-wave, sometimes called non-rectified, blink 60 times per second, which can create a dizzying flickering effect. Orr told us that when a non-rectified strand is moving, the flickering becomes more apparent, and we confirmed this effect during our testing: Just by giving a non-rectified strand a slight jiggle, we made the lights take on a strobe effect that was very unpleasant to look at. In our tests, even when they were not moving, those lights seemed to have a harshness, an electronic feel, that the rectified lights didn’t have.

For outdoor lights, our experts directed us toward a specific style of LED, 5-millimeter wide-angle conicals. The bulbs on these lights are stubby and don’t have the homespun look of the small glass candle found on other mini lights. They are much brighter than regular mini lights (both LED and incandescent), and the unique shape of the bulb adds depth and complexity to the lights’ appearance. As Orr told us, this shape allows the strand to “refract the light and create a cool look depending on the angle of view. It appears that some are brighter than others and it adds contrast.” Orr, who specializes in exterior displays, added that mm wide-angle lights are generally his favorite light. And Christmas Designers, in a video dedicated to the bulbs, says these lights are “by far the most popular set we sell.”

But as with regular LED bulbs, the color of the light is a concern. We figure that if you’re reading this guide, you’re probably interested in replacing an old set of incandescent lights—but even if you want something more efficient and durable, you don’t want to give up the traditional lights’ familiar warm glow. Unfortunately, that is a big issue with LEDs.

Both Orr and Woodward warned us that LEDs simply do not look like incandescents. Due to improvements in the technology, many companies manufacture a “warm white” color that, depending on the quality of the LED, can closely mimic, but not fully achieve, the pinpoint sparkle of an incandescent. Orr stressed that “LED technology varies throughout the industry, and a warm white from one supplier can vary in hues and color drastically from another.” He even suggested buying strands from a few different manufacturers to compare them and see which hue you like best before making a large purchase. Once you find something you like, he said, buy from only that manufacturer. Our testing confirmed that there is a tremendous variety in LED color hues, from the fantastic to the terrible.

We dismissed companies that had overall poor reviews (Holiday Time), strange or incomplete bulb selections (EcoSmart), or suspiciously low pricing (Home Accents). Other companies, like Hometown Evolution, AGPtek, and Deneve, fall more into general exterior decor and don’t have a very good selection of Christmas lights. AGPtek, in particular, deals only in solar-powered or battery lights, which are more of a specialty item, and we wanted to concentrate on general tree and exterior lighting.

Our original testing consisted of 1sets, including colored and white mini lights, both LED and incandescent. We also tested a number of mm wide-angle conical LEDs, since our experts recommended them for exterior use. Then, in 2015, we looked at two new sets from Christmas Designers, the TSmooth LED Lights in both warm white and multicolor.

Ready to begin testing.

To evaluate the lights, we wound and unwound them, draped them over and into Christmas trees and rhododendrons, and tucked them in and out of deck railings. Basically, we tried to use the lights how they’re intended to be used. We tested the weather impermeability of the exterior lights by plugging them in and sinking the strands of lights into a 3-gallon bucket of water. While this test was a bit extreme, it’s certainly possible that any set of exterior lights will end up in a puddle or draped in a gutter.

Overall, we found that the wire quality has a lot to do with the success of a strand of lights. Some of the tested lights had tidy, close-knit strands of wire, while others were loose and messy. Some wires needed untwisting before use, like an old phone cord, and still others continued to accordion back on themselves no matter how we tried to stretch them out and lay them flat.

We also assessed each strand for color quality, using the incandescent strands as a benchmark, with the input of Susan Moriarty, executive creative director and founder of The Soapbox Studio. She’s a die-hard fan of the warmth that incandescent Christmas lights emit, so we asked her to compare the classics against new LEDs. Even though Moriarty did her evaluations in a blind fashion, she consistently chose along brand lines, a result that backed up Orr’s suggestion to select a single manufacturer and stick with it.

Long-term test notes

After two seasons of having the GE Energy Smart Colorite LED Miniature Lights on my tree, I have no complaints. Just recently (fall 2016) I took them out of storage for the holidays, and all of the bulbs work fine. I’ve noticed that the wire stranding has loosened a little, but the lights are still fairly well organized, and I don’t foresee any issues with putting them around a tree.

The competition

GKI/Bethlehem’s LEDs are nice lights, but we found that their color and wire quality didn’t match that of the GE or Christmas Designers lights.

The multicolor LED lights sold by Noma (known as Holiday Wonderland in the US) had a nice hue in our tests, but they’re non-rectified, so they have the potential for flicker—and if you merely jiggle them, they produce a dizzying strobe effect.

We also tested Noma’s mm wide-angle multicolored LEDs. Like the other Noma lights, this set is non-rectified. And because these lights employ a two-piece bulb and socket design, there is a chance of water infiltration, making them less than ideal for exterior applications.

GKI/Bethlehem’s wide-angle LEDs had a tidy wire but lacked the color quality of the wide-angle LEDs from the specialty stores. The whites had a far whiter hue. Even though this strand is sold as a warm white, in our tests The Soapbox Studio’s Susan Moriarty didn’t see a whole lot of warmth to it.

Wide-angle conical lights from Christmas Designers (top) and Christmas Light Source (bottom). Notice what a disaster the wiring is on the CLS lights. The best of the tested lights had nice, organized wires like the ones from Christmas Designers.

The wide-angle LEDs from Christmas Light Source had the most frustrating wire of all the lights we tested. Each bulb needed twisting and turning for the strand to lie flat, and even then it kept trying to spring back to how it was. The individual wires were loose from one another and had uneven loops. It was a nightmare to feed them through a tight spot like a railing or even between two branches.

The Brite Star clear incandescents we tested were very nice, and in light quality they were on a par with the strands from Christmas Designers and GE. We didn’t make them a recommendation because they have a 2½-inch spacing, which seems a little tight for most people. As we mention above, inches is the standard.

While the Brite Star incandescents were a success in our tests, the company’s LED Mini Ice Lights were a total failure. Everything bad about LEDs was on display with these lights. When we plugged them in, the result was like having 50 small computer screens lit up on a wire strand. It was just awful. They’re non-rectified, and the effect is not a positive one. The light that these LEDs emit is about as natural as the ingredients list on a Twinkie.

Cluster lights

Cluster lights offer a unique and hazy look, but because they have so many bulbs per strand, they quickly get expensive.

In 2016, we tested two different styles of cluster lights. Such strands, which have been popular in Europe for years, have much smaller bulbs (either mm or mm conicals) and a vastly higher bulb density—a 10-foot strand has almost 450 bulbs on it, in contrast to traditional mini lights, which might have only 50 bulbs on a 16-foot strand. With regular mini lights, the bulb is attached to the main wire, but on a cluster strand, the bulb sits on the end of a 2½-inch extension coming off the main wire. The spacing on these extensions can be as little as ⅛ inch. On a tree, cluster lights offer a hazy, almost fairy-tale effect.

We found them available in two styles: straight strands and tree ready. The straight strands are self-explanatory, but the tree style is a little more complicated. This design—consisting of a central (non-lit) wire with a series of cluster strands coming off it, each one longer than the last—allows you to hang the main line vertically from the top of the tree (with the shortest cluster at the top) and then unravel each cluster around the tree. Lighting a tree this way takes hardly any time at all (this video shows the process). The lights are available for either 6-foot or 6.75-foot trees in warm or cool white.

If you are interested in cluster lights, we recommend sticking with a trusted retailer due to the variances we’ve seen with LED light quality. The ones we tested were from Christmas Designers, and these bulbs have the same warm incandescent-like look as the company’s other LED products.

LIGHT BULB LINGO

Before you head out in search of a new bulb, get a grasp on terminology manufacturers use to measure the input and output of certain types of light bulbs.

Watts indicate the amount of energy the bulb will use. Bulbs with lower wattage will use less electricity, and can therefore help keep the electricity bill down. Here, the age-old mantra holds true: Less is more. • 7.lumens per square foot in hallways • 1lumens per square foot in the bedroom • 3lumens per square foot in dining rooms, kitchens, and offices • 7lumens per square foot in bathrooms

Typically, a standard 100-watt incandescent bulb emits approximately 1600 lumens. Newer types of light bulbs, however, require less power and emit just as much light.

Headlights

Think of your OEM headlights as that suit you wore to your high school prom. That powdered blue tuxedo was cool back in the day, but it’s hardly fashion forward by today’s standards. The same is true for your car’s headlights. While most OEM lights provide adequate illumination, most times their style is straight out the 70s. Thankfully, you can pull your car’s exterior out of the past with a set of aftermarket headlights. Replacement headlights go above and beyond the uninspired design of OEM lights to enhance you car’s look and attitude. These exterior accents range from the sleek and sophisticated to the rugged and race ready, and our diverse catalog of automotive lights are sure to please drivers of all tastes.

Aftermarket headlights do more than just alter the look of your exterior – they can also enhance your car’s light output.

Helpful Tip

If your factory headlights aren’t meeting your standards, consider picking up a set of Spyder headlights. LED headlights produce a significantly stronger beam than regular OEM headlights to increase your visibility at night. Plus, they use less power than OE lights and stand up to weather and water damage better than Halogen bulbs. In addition to LED headlights, you can upgrade your front end with Euro headlights or Halo headlights. Euro lights, like Spyder Euro headlights, are ideal for import cars seeking a more continental style. Additionally, Euro beam patters are significantly wider than normal beam patterns found on factory lights, improving visibility at night and in bad weather. However, if state-of-the-art performance and style is what you want, take a look at Anzo halo headlights. Halo headlamps feature CCFL technology, which means they burn more efficiently than other lights on the market and add a super-modern style to your front end.

Tail Lights

Sure, your tail lights’ primary responsibility is to illuminate your back-end, but they also help determine your car’s look. Unfortunately, most OEM tail lights fall short in the style department. You can bring your car’s backside looks into the 21st century with a set of replacement tail lights. From bright and bold LEDs to subtle designs inspired by European luxury, aftermarket tail lights give you the freedom to add any look to your vehicle.

Bumper Lights and Corner Lights

Bumper and corner lights are the small but essential accents that tie your car’s style together. If your car’s front-end still looks frumpy even after installing a set of new aftermarket headlights, it may have something to do with your bumper lights. In the same way a chipped tooth can ruin a perfect smile, cracked bumper lights, parking lights, and corner lights can diminish your front-end looks. Pick up a set of Anzo bumper lights to fill out your style. These bumper lights come in a variety of styles and feature a cosmopolitan design that adds sophistication to any bumper. For cars suffering from outdated corner lights, consider a set of APC Amber corner lights. These cool amber corner lights are custom designed to your vehicle, making them the easy-to-install way to brighten up the sides of your vehicle.

Helpful Tip: Need help finding the best LED headlights for your car? Take a look at the customer reviews on our site while you browse and see what people are saying about our aftermarket lights.

Third Brake Lights

Third brake LED lights take your rear-end lighting system to the next level. These lights provide drivers with an instant, cost-effective lighting upgrade, and most 3rd brake lights install easily with hand tools or automotive-grade tape. Truck and SUV owners should take a look at the Anzo LED third brake light. The Anzo 3rd brake light features a set of long-lasting LED lights and adds a rugged look to the back of your cab. It’s ideal for domestic trucks and SUVs, and comes in multiple colors. Truck owners in search of an attention grabbing light accessory should check out the Putco tail light bar. This light bar is constructed with striking LED lights that are custom fit to your truck’s tailgate. For budget conscious truck owners, this lighting accessory is a no-brainer.

How To Install Your Car Headlights

Contrary to popular belief, you don’t need a seasoned mechanic to install a set of replacement headlights. In fact, adding a new set of lamps to your car is easy, regardless of your experience with do-it-yourself projects. Check out this video and see how you can install a new pair of Spyder Euro headlights to your vehicle in under an hour.

Off-Road Lights

Trucks, SUVs, and Off-road vehicles have different needs than regular automobiles. When you’re fording through dark trails or cruising through the campsite, those high-beam headlamps aren’t going to cut it. Off-road lights are designed to meet the specific needs of heavy duty vehicles and enhance the style of your exterior. They come in a variety of designs to increase your visibility and truck’s rugged look. Before you start browsing, take a look at these popular off-road lighting options to find the best set of lights for your vehicle.

Flood Lights

If you’re facing inclement weather while off-roading, you may need additional illumination to get to your destination safely. In these situations, rely on a set of car flood lights. These flood lights have a wider beam pattern than OEM headlamps and make for a great exterior ornament for any truck or SUV. If you’re interested in mounting a set of flood lights onto your vehicle, take a look at KC HiLites off-road lights. Heavy rain and inclement weather are no match for these lights. These KC Hilities flood light kits come with impressive HID lights and feature a compact design that’s perfect for Jeeps and SUVs that are short on space.

Fog Lights

Fog can spell major problems for drivers. Driving through heavy fog can make the straightest paths seem uncertain, and even the most experienced drivers could get lost in the haze. You can see past heavy fog, however, with a set of high powered fog lights. Car fog lights are different from flood lights in that their beam shines at a downward angle to avoid your beams reflecting off of hazy weather. Drivers who face fog on a daily basis should pick up PIAA 2000 Series Fog Lights. These compact fog lights fit most vehicles and produce a wide 55-degree light beam to increase your visibility on the road. If these lights don’t suit your style, then check out Anzo LED fog lights. The LEDs on Anzo Fog Lights add over 400 Lumens to your existing light system and are available in multiple sizes and styles. In addition to the safety they provide, fog lights can also enhance the rugged style of your truck or SUV. For drivers looking to enhance their Jeep’s style with a set of mountable fog lights, check out PIAA 520 Series fog lights. This off-road fog light kit comes with two high powered bulbs and a rugged style that provides any vehicle with a set of tough off-road lighting accents.

Long Range Off-Road Lights

Off-Road long range lights can bulk up the look of any SUV or truck. They drastically increase your visibility at night and mount onto most vehicles in minutes. If your truck is lacking in the lighting department, a long range off-road light kit might be just the thing to enhance your 4×4’s visibility. Among the many off-road range lights we carry, our most popular among off-road enthusiasts are the KC HiLites Daylighters. These powerful HID lights increase your ability to drive along dark trails and come equipped with a rugged casing that enhances your vehicle’s off-road look.

LED Lights

LED lights shine brighter than OEM headlights and can even triple your range of vision in some cases. Additionally, they’re built to last longer than incandescent lights. Unlike standard car lights, LEDs don’t have a filament, which makes them more resistant to water damage. LED lights also use up less battery power than incandescent lights and fire up faster than incandescent bulbs, making them ideal for brake lights. If you’re thinking about switching over to an LED light system, check out Anzo LED tail lights. These replacement tail lights give your rear-end increased visibility and make for a great off-road accent for trucks and SUVs.

Halogen Lights

Halogen is the standard bulb for most replacement headlights and tail lights. These lights burn brighter and longer than regular incandescent lights and are more energy efficient. However, like most incandescent bulbs, halogen lights are more susceptible to wear and weather damage than LED lights. If you plan on buying a pair of halogen headlights, make sure they’re encased in a weather resistant cover. Otherwise, the filament could be vulnerable to dust or water damage.

HID Lights

The intense glow of HID (High Intensity Discharge) Xenon lights is caused by a superheated ball of xenon gas, which burns with the same level of intensity as daylight. HID lights are typically found in off-road driving lights and flood lights. HID bulbs are ideal for drivers in search of high performance, high-efficiency lighting. If you’re thinking about adding these lights to your vehicle, check out PIAA HID lights. These driving lights only use 3watts of power and dramatically increase your visibility at night.

CCFL Lights

CCFL stands for Cold Cathode Fluorescent Lamps. These lights are sometimes referred to as “halos” for the unique, circular light pattern. Halos produce a concentrated beam of light that shines father down the road than other car lights and are ideal for cars driving at high speeds. Plus, CCFL halos give any vehicle a high-performance, high-tech style. For drivers seeking a performance halo light, check out Anzo CCFL headlights. These are car lights are custom fit to your car’s front end and install under an hour with simple hand tools.

How Weather Determines Your Automotive Lights

Use Lighting Accessories to Define your Truck or SUV’s Style

Aftermarket headlights and tail lights can help redefine your vehicle’s look and attitude. However, if those lighting upgrades aren’t enough, consider tricking out your vehicle with a set of automotive lighting accessories. We carry an exhaustive line of light accessories for trucks and SUVs, from tailgate light bars to tail light covers. If you’re looking for an additional lighting accessory for your front end, pick up a set of PUTCO Dayliners. These bright LED lights install directly underneath your truck’s headlights with 3M automotive tape and provide your vehicle with a set of attention grabbing accents that look great at any time of day.

If you’re looking for something a little bolder for your lights, consider installing a truck light bar on your truck or SUV. Truck bars do more than just provide you with additional illumination at night or in bad weather – these mountable lighting accessories embody the rugged attitude associated with off-road vehicles. SUV owners seeking a total front end upgrade should consider the KC Hilities light bar. KC Hilities has long been associated with the off-road lifestyle, and their light bar is a favorite among Jeep owners for its easy to install design and its tough, wear resistant design.

Let’s Connect

Smart home products, not just smart lighting, must connect in some way. The four biggest smart home automation standards are Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, ZigBee, and Z-Wave.

We’ve all heard of Wi-Fi. It’s what we use to connect our laptops, cell phones, and tablets to the rest of the world. Wi-Fi takes a lot of processing power, which isn’t a problem for devices that you can recharge overnight. However, it isn’t the ideal solution for smart home products

Future Smart Home Trends and the Products You’ll Be Using

Future Smart Home Trends and the Products You’ll Be Using

It’s time to jump into your time machine. You’re about to uncover what could be the biggest trends in the smart home industry in 202and the products you might be using.

Read More such as light bulbs, window sensors, and the like.

Bluetooth is another standard connection that’s also imperfect. Though Bluetooth requires less power than Wi-Fi, it has a very limited range. Additionally, there are limitations to the number of devices that you can connect using Bluetooth.

This brings us to ZigBee and Z-Wave, which have become the two most common smart home wireless standards. Like Bluetooth, these standards require very low power consumption. Better still, their ranges are much greater than Wi-Fi because they operate through what is known as a mesh network.

Unlike Wi-Fi, which requires a router as a central connecting point, mesh networks allow each device to have a wireless signal. In doing so, devices can talk to one another in a more direct manner. When one device drops out, alternative routes remain, allowing the whole system to stay online.

Another benefit to both ZigBee and Z-Wave? You can use them to connect hundreds of smart home devices at the same time.

Size Matters

By definition, you determine the size of a light bulb by measuring its diameter. Each size is expressed in increments of either 1/inch or one millimeter, depending on where you live. For example, an A-1bulb is 1eighths-inches or 2-3/inches in diameter. In metrics, this is the E2bulb because it has a diameter of 2mm.

If you’re a little bit confused by these measurements, don’t be. When it comes to smart lighting products for the home, the choices are still somewhat limited

How dental operatory lights work

The oral cavity is a dark and secluded field. Because of this, the operatory light is a crucial part of the daily armamentarium for every dentist and hygienist. Better visibility means better treatment for the patient. While halogen lights have been popular historically, newer LED technology is making its way into the field, providing brighter, more functional lighting for your treatment room.

Important notes before getting your project started

Step 1: Get a clear vision! Because each project is unique, there is no all-in-one solution. Different projects require different types of LED strips. 

Do you want to dim your lights or control them with a remote or wall switch? 

Wattage consumed per strip of LEDs

Power consumption is one of the reasons we as a society have begun switching to LEDs. Wattage tells us how much power we are consuming while these lights are on, and in turn how much we’ll have to pay at the end of each month. Once again, be sure to verify the wattage per foot, meter, or reel before you buy.

Some may read “2watts” on a reel and then get home and realize this is per meter or per foot, meaning the whole reel actually uses much more. Making matters worse, they have bought a power supply that covers 30 watts, thinking that would be enough. This often occurs when a seller doesn’t properly list important information in an easy to read format.

Further Information

Cree’s leadership begins with innovative materials, primarily silicon carbide (SiC), that provide high-efficiency performance for numerous semiconductor applications. Using SiC as a platform material, Cree has spent over 20 years developing an array of new technologies that far surpass traditional ones. 

LED Lighting

Recognizing the revolutionary potential of LED lighting, in 200Cree expanded its product lines into LED-lighting applications, such as ceiling fixtures. Today, products from Cree’s Lighting group are available to builders and homeowners through The Home Depot and other retailers around the world. Cree’s direct customers include national restaurant chains and government agencies.

After pioneering developments in the LED indoor-lighting market, Cree expanded into outdoor lighting, in 2011, with the acquisition of Ruud Lighting, Inc., a leader in outdoor LED lighting. Ruud added an extensive LED-lighting product line to Cree’s portfolio, including the BetaLED and LEDway brands.

As part of this acquisition, Cree gained additional lighting brands, including Ruud Direct, E-conolight, Kramer Lighting, Beta-Kramer and Beta Lighting.

In March 2013, Cree began offering LED light bulbs (40-W and 60-W equivalent) for the consumer market.

Competitiveness

Product reliability, innovative technologies, prompt services are core competitiveness of MOSO.

MOSO take product reliability as the key value in industry. It is the first company to offer years warranty for LED drivers. All products are compliant to international safety standards. MOSO even invested a UL & TUV certified laboratory to verify new designs are compliant to customer requirements. To guarantee optimal performance and safety, MOSO products use only the highest quality components.

MOSO keep researching new technologies in products designs. After five generations of product developments, nowadays MOSO offers full range of programmable LED drivers to cover whole international markets. One driver can be programmed to different outputs and to achieve optimal light efficiency and performance.

MOSO listens and reacts to market very promptly. Lead time of standard LED drivers from MOSO China is only one week. If clients purchase from MOSO local distributors they will get even more efficient service. Any products inquiries and failures will be answered within 2hours.

Product Portfolio – LED lighting drivers – Desktop / wall-mount power adaptors- Switch power supplies- Solar inverters- PCB manufacturing  

Connectors

FEATURED “Samsung D-series Special Color” Packages Engineered to Bring Out the Most Desirable Color Tones of Illuminated Objects

Samsung Electronics announced a new family of chip-on-board LED lighting packages, labeled the “Samsung D-series Special Color.” The packages are engineered to bring out the most desirable color tones of objects whose viewing is particularly color-sensitive, making them optimal for many commercial…

FEATURED

New Additions to LUXEON SunPlus Series for Horticulture

Lumileds recently introduced three new products in its LUXEON SunPlus Series of award winning LEDs for horticulture lighting. The LUXEON SunPlus Series is the only line of LEDs on the market to be tested and binned by photosynthetic photon flux (PPF). The portfolio of colors enables wavelength…

High Conductive Foils Enabling Large Area Lighting

Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP as one of the leading partners for research and development for surface technologies and organic electronics and Sefar AG, a leading manufacturer of precision fabrics from monofilaments, developed a roll-to-roll…

 

 

 

 

How to save up to 86%? Here is little trick.

You must visit the page of sales. Here is the link. If you don’t care about which brand is better, then you can choose the Specialty Light Bulbs by the price and buy from the one who will offer the greatest discount.

 

 

Final Word

First of all thanks for reading my article to the end! I hope you find my reviews listed here useful and that it allows you to make a proper comparison of what is best to fit your needs and budget. Don’t be afraid to try more than one product if your first pick doesn’t do the trick.

Most important, have fun and choose your Specialty Light Bulbs wisely! Good luck!

So, TOP3 of Specialty Light Bulbs

 

 

Questions? Leave a comment below!

Chatting about Specialty Light Bulbs is my passion! Leave me a question in the comments, I answer each and every one and would love to get to know you better!



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