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Top Of The Best Complete Track Lighting Kits Reviewed In 2018

Last Updated November 1, 2018
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Adrian HoffmanHi! My name is Reginald Meyer. After putting in 50+ hours of research and testing, I made a list of the best Complete Track Lighting Kits of 2018 and explained their differences and advantages.

In this article, I will be categorizing the items according to their functions and most typical features. I hope that my Top 10 list will provide you great options in buying the right fit for you.

 

 

Feel free to explore the podium, click on the pictures to find out more.

 

 

How to save up to 86%? Here is little trick.

You must visit the page of sales. Here is the link. If you don’t care about which brand is better, then you can choose the Complete Track Lighting Kits by the price and buy from the one who will offer the greatest discount.

 

 

№1 – Pro Track Chace 50″ Wide 6-Light Complete Track Kit

 
Pro Track Chace 50
Pros
50″ wide bar x 9″ high. Canopy is 5″ wide x 1 1/2″ high. Weighs 17 lbs.
Includes six 50 watt GU10 halogen bulbs.
Adjustable contemporary track-style six-light ceiling light fixture by Pro Track®.
 

 

№2 – Pro Track Axel 4-Light Swing Arm Complete Track Light Kit

 
Pro Track Axel 4-Light Swing Arm Complete Track Light Kit
Pros
49″ wide at maximum extension. Extends 9″ from ceiling. Canopy is 8″ wide x 1″ high. Weighs 6 lbs.
Includes four 50 watt GU10 halogen bulbs, and two 8″ rods to extend overall drop to 16″.
Complete track kit features four adjustable arms and two swing-sections. From the from Pro Track® brand.
 

 

№3 – DnD 6-Light Adjustable Track Lighting Kit – Flexible Foldable Arms- GU10 Bulbs Included. CE2000-BZ (Black)

 
DnD 6-Light Adjustable Track Lighting Kit - Flexible Foldable Arms- GU10 Bulbs Included. CE2000-BZ (Black)
Pros
Adjustable Track Heads. 6 multi directional adjustable track heads. Individual light head can be rotated 355° horizontally, 90° vertically. Swivel, turn, and angle to different directions including position straight down.
Flexible. Fixture 3 arms can make “I”, “C”, “U”, or “Z” shaped pattern. Easy to adjust, and stays in desired position. Each kit comes with 2 optional ( can install with or without ) standing supports, which allow users to fix the arms in certain position if users do not want to re-position the light bar after installation.
 

 

Extended Downrod

A non-standard downrod is used when the ceiling height is greater than feet. See our downrod sizing guide to determine which length you will need for your ceiling height.

A sloped application is intended for room where the ceiling slants at 3degrees or higher. The fan installs into the ceiling with the use of an adapter, like this Modern Fan sloped ceiling adapter.

Lastly, look for a ceiling fan with a blade span that matches the room’s square footage and height. If you choose a fan that is too small for the space, it will struggle to move air. If you choose a fan that is too large for the space, not only will be off putting, but it will waste too much energy.

Sizing Tips: Here are some additional dimensions to consider when you buy a ceiling fan a new ceiling fan.

CEILING FAN LIGHTS

To add lighting or not to add lighting, that is the question. Choosing a ceiling fan with lighting is a matter of personal preference. If you plan to install the fan in a space with good natural lighting or sufficient light fixtures, buy a ceiling fan without a light kit.

If the space could use a boost of general lighting, choose a ceiling fan with a light kit. Today’s fans offer a range of lighting sources, including halogen, fluorescent, and LEDs.

Fluorescent

Fluorescent light sources use 7percent less energy than incandescent light sources and have an average lifespan of 10,000 hours. Ceiling fans with CFL bulbs emit cool or warm lighting.

LED light sources consume very little energy and have an average lifespan of 50,000 hours. These ceiling fans with energy-efficient bulbs emit cool or warm lighting.

Antique Ceiling Fan Designs

Antique and vintage style ceiling fans complement traditional and vintage home decors. They often feature decorative filigree and scrollwork on the motor housing and blade brackets. Many light kits include a warm globe light. To achieve a vintage-inspired look, buy a ceiling fan that features an antique-style and pair it with American Empire furniture, floral prints and textiles, and warm brass and copper finishes. A warm pastel palette ties the space together.

Contemporary Ceiling Fans

Contemporary ceiling fans are a great addition to any modern and transitional space. The modern style ceiling fans feature clean lines, smooth metallic finishes, and minimal adornment. Buy a ceiling fan with a contemporary feel and pair it with casual contemporary furniture (avoid wood carving and adornments), natural textiles such as cotton, linen or wool, and chrome, nickel or stainless steel hardware. A bold color palette and geometric accents bring the look together.

Rustic Ceiling Fans

Rustic ceiling fans pair well with country, mission and western interiors. These rustic-inspired ceiling fans feature straight lines and dark wood finishes with homespun accents. To achieve this look, buy a ceiling fan with a rustic look and pair it with lodge-style furniture, checkered or striped prints, handmade accents, such as baskets, carved wooden bowls, and pottery, and hand-forged metal accents. Soft, muted colors, rough hewn wood and hand-forged metal accents round out this look.

Tropical Ceiling fans

Tropical ceiling fans complement coastal, island, and nautical home interiors. The island-inspired fans feature bamboo, natural palm leaf, and rattan blades with distressed wood finishes. To achieve this look, buy a ceiling fan with a tropical feel and pair it with rattan furniture, bright colors and natural patterns, tropical flowers and plants, and handcrafted items.

CEILING FAN EFFICIENCY & AIRFLOW

The motor is the heart of any ceiling fan, and it determines the airflow and efficiency of your ceiling fan. You don’t have to have to be an electrical engineer to understand a fan motor, but it’s the most important part of any fan. Consider the factors below the next time you buy a ceiling fan:

High Airflow

High airflow ceiling fans circulate more air and consume less energy than standard fans. These fans are ideal for garages, warehouses, and outdoor spaces, such as your patio and porch. When you buy a ceiling fan with high airflow you get an added bonus: high-airflow fans are known to drive away mosquitoes and other backyard pests.

Ceiling Fans with Remote Control

The handheld remote control offers the most convenience of all the fan control options. The lightweight and portable control operated within a 30 to 50-foot range, making it ideal for high ceiling fans and hard to reach places. Handheld remote control ceiling fans are also ideal for bedrooms.

Wall Control

The fan speed wall control option allows you to operate the fan speed, direction and lighting with the press of a button. The stationary remote has a range up to 40 feet, making it ideal for families with kids. A wall control is ideal for kitchens, dining rooms, living rooms and multipurpose rooms.

Color temperature

After lumens, the next concept you’ll want to understand is color temperature. Measured on the Kelvin scale, color temperature isn’t really a measure of heat. Instead, it’s a measure of the color that a light source produces, ranging from yellow on the low end of the scale to bluish on the high end, with whitish light in the middle.

An easy way to keep track of color temperature is to think of a flame: it starts out yellow and orange, but when it gets really hot, it turns blue. You could also think of color temperature in terms of the sun — low, yellowy color temperatures mimic the tone of light at sunrise or sunset, while hotter, more bluish-white color temperatures are more akin to daylight (sure enough, bulbs with color temperatures like these are commonly called “daylight” bulbs). This is also why a lot of people prefer high color temperatures during the day and lower color temperatures in the morning and evening.

Generally speaking, incandescents sit at the bottom of the scale with their yellow light, while CFLs and LEDs have long been thought to tend toward the high, bluish end of the spectrum. This has been a steady complaint about new lighting alternatives, as many people prefer the warm, familiar, low color temperature of incandescents. Manufacturers are listening, though, and in this case they heard consumers loud and clear, with more and more low-color-temperature CFL and LED options hitting the shelves. Don’t believe me? Take another look at those two paper lamps in the picture above, because they’re both CFL bulbs — from the same manufacturer, no less.

Sylvania often color codes its packaging. Blue indicates a hot, bluish color temperature, while the lighter shade indicates a white, more neutral light.

Bulb shape

As you’re probably aware, light bulbs come in a fairly wide variety of shapes. Sure, it’s easy enough to tell a hardware store clerk that you want “one of those flamey-looking lights,” or “just a normal ol’ bulby light bulb,” but knowing the actual nomenclature might save you some time.

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Let’s start with the base of the bulb, the part that screws in. In the US, the most common shape by far is E26, with the “E” standing for Edison and the “26” referring to the diameter of the base in millimeters. You might also see E2bulbs from time to time, which is the European standard. Those should still fit into common American fixtures, but keep in mind that voltage ratings are different in the two regions, with American bulbs rated for 120 volts compared to 220-240 volts in Europe. For smaller sockets, like you might find with a candelabra, you’ll want to look for an E1base.

As for the bulb itself, the typical shape that you’re probably used to is an A1bulb. Increase that number to A2or A23, and you’ve got the same shape, but bigger. Bulbs made to resemble flames are F-shaped, which is easy enough to remember, as are globes, which go by the letter G. If it’s a floodlight you want, you’ll want to look for “BR” (bulging reflector) or “PAR” (parabolic aluminized reflector). Those bulbs are designed to throw all their light in one direction only, which makes them useful for spot lighting, overhead lighting and the headlights in your car.

Your automated-lighting options

It used to be that if you wanted your lights to turn on and off automatically, then you had to rely on a cheap wall socket timer, the kind you might use to control a Christmas tree. These days, with a modest boom in smart lighting currently under way, it’s easier than ever to dive into the sort of advanced automation controls that can make any home feel modern and futuristic. Use the right devices, and you’ll be able to control your lights in all sorts of creative ways, and make your life a little bit easier in the process.

The most obvious way to get started with smart lighting is with the bulbs themselves. You’ve got plenty of intelligent options from brands both big and small, and to find the one that’s best for you, you’re going to need to understand what sets them apart.

Connect with these 3IFTTT-friendly smart devices (pictures)

The first thing to look at is how the bulbs communicate with you. Some offer direct connections with your smart phone via Bluetooth or Wi-Fi, which makes setup as simple as screwing the thing in and following in-app pairing instructions.

Others transmit using a distinct frequency like ZigBee or Z-Wave. Bulbs like those might be a better fit for bigger smart home setups, as it’s typically a little easier to sync them up with things like motion detectors and smart locks. Setup can be slightly more advanced, as you’ll need a separate hub or gateway device capable of translating that distinct frequency into a Wi-Fi signal your router can comprehend.

Some smart bulbs come with their own gateway. Others, like the Cree Connected LED, require a third-party control device, like the Wink Hub.

Color control

If you’re looking for a little more color in your life, then be sure and take a look at a product like the Philips Hue Starter Kit. Aside from being fully automatable via a mobile app and control hub, the Hue LED bulbs are capable of on-demand color changes. Just pull out your phone, select one of millions of possible shades, and the light will match it. And if you’re into voice control, Hue bulbs hit the compatibility trifecta — they’ll work with Siri, Alexa, and the Google Assistant.

Because Philips opened its lighting controls to third-party developers, you’ll also find lots of fun novelty uses for Hue bulbs, like changing the color of your lights in rhythm with whatever music you’re playing. There’s even an app that’ll sync your Hue lights up with certain TV programming.

Hue lights are also directly compatible with the popular web service IFTTT, with recipes already available that will change the color of your lights to match the weather, or to signal a touchdown from your favorite football team, or even to indicate when your stocks are doing well.

Voltage

As with most home lighting, there are two basic types of track lighting systems: line voltage and low voltage. Line-voltage systems use the standard electrical wires and current in the home, which provides 120 volts to the fixtures. These type of track lighting installations tend to use incandescent spot lights or flood lights and have the largest light fixtures. Low-voltage systems have a small transformer built in which takes the current down to 1volts, allowing the system to use a greater variety of bulbs and light fixtures; often much smaller than line voltage lighting, but equally as bright. Low-voltage track lighting bulbs also last longer, getting about 2-3,000 hours versus the 700 to 1,000 hours a line-voltage bulb will get. In the case of low-voltage LED systems, the lights can last an impressive 10,000 to 100,000 hours.

Installation

If you already have a ceiling light fixture, track lights are easy to install. Simply remove the old fixture, screw the track into the ceiling using toggle bolts or other appropriate anchors, connect the new track to the electrical box, snap your lights in place and enjoy the fun of moving them around to get the lighting in your room exactly the way you want it!

The Hillman Group 59151Small Small Wood Screw Assortment, 195-Pack

Outlite A100 Portable Ultra Bright Handheld LED Flashlight with Adjustable Focus and Light Modes, Outdoor Water Resistant Torch, Powered Tactical Flashlight for Camping Hiking etc

Snow Joe SHOVELUTION SJ-SHLV018-IN Strain-Reducing Snow Shovel w/ Spring Assisted Handle

Kohree 300 Led Curtain icicle lights, Remote Curtain Lights for Christmas, Home, Balcony, Holiday, Festivals, Wedding Party Decorations, Mode Warm White, UL Certification

Small kitchens

Wren Kitchens Limited, The Nest, Falkland Way, Barton-upon-Humber, DN15RL (COMPANY REGISTERED NUMBER 06799478) act as a credit intermediary for a single lender, Clydesdale Financial Services Limited, trading as Barclays Partner Finance and can only offer you loans provided by them.

Barclays Partner Finance is a trading name of Clydesdale Financial Services Limited a wholly owned subsidiary of Barclays Bank PLC. Clydesdale Financial Services Limited is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (Financial Services Register number: 311753). Registered in England. Registered No. 290172Registered office: Churchill Place, London E15HP.

Sprocket Head from TECH Lighting

Track is an especially appealing option in situations that require long runs and can use line voltage (120V). Line voltage allows for longer runs without the concern for voltage drop. Through the use of a concealed conductor, track systems are able to safely run at 120V without the risk of shock. While there are low voltage track systems available, the majority of systems are line voltage.

To configure a track lighting system, there are four things to consider:

Layout and Components

Systems are available with standard straight track or with flexible track in single-circuit or two-circuit configurations. Almost any layout is possible using a creative selection of track connectors and track lengths. Depending on the type of track, systems can be installed directly to, or suspended from, the ceiling.

One of the most important factors to consider is how to provide power to a track system. If power is being supplied in the middle of a run, a canopy with a power feed is required. If power will be supplied at the end of a run, an end connector with a power feed can be used.

Fixtures

The first thing to consider when choosing fixtures for a track system is whether the two are compatible. It is important to choose fixtures that use the same track standard as the system itself. In some cases, manufacturers will offer adapters so that their fixtures can be used with several of their systems. Another thing to consider is what is being illuminated. Highlighting a piece of artwork would be best accomplished using a precision spot light while more general illumination might be better served with a flood light or pendant.

In addition to the track standard, the voltage of the fixture should also be considered. If a low voltage track head or pendant is to be used on a line voltage track, an inline transformer will be required. This usually takes the form of a small box near the point where the fixture attaches to the track. This transformer will convert the line voltage (120V) feed to the appropriate low voltage (12V) signal required by a low voltage fixture.

LEDme Galileo Low Voltage Track Lighting from WAC Lighting

Accessories

Most track fixtures can be modified for many applications by purchasing accessories. You can use special lenses to change the shape of the light (honeycomb louvers, spread lenses and beam elongating lenses) or the color (color lenses and color dichroic lenses). A framing projector or barn door accessory can be used to help direct and focus the light.

Assess Your Current Home Décor

Start things off by visualizing the space that you want to install a pendant light in and create a mental picture of the exact look that you want to achieve.

Browse lighting to look for pendant lights that would fit the design style of the room and the statement you envisioned.

Details

This mains-voltage kit offers Class electrical protection, and thus requires a connection to electrical earth during installation. No transformer is required for its use. An IP20 rating signifies zero protection against water, so the Acorn Kit is unsuitable for bathroom or washroom siting.

Bulb requirements

The Robus Acorn 3-Light and Track Kit requires x max 50W halogen GUbulbs, available to purchase separately.

Halogen GUbulbs inherently produce a warm white light, and offer superb colour rendering with a default maximum CRI 100 score. They are also dimmable, so you can dim the light of this track-lighting kit in conjunction with an existing dimmer switch.

Page 5:Accessories

Philips makes a wide number of smart LED lights that offer a mix of colors and  effects that you can control remotely. Plus, LEDs last much longer than other types of lights, and consume less energy, too. Philips Hue lights also integrate with

Bulbs and Lightstrips

You can expand your lighting options through a number of different Philips Hue bulbs. These include everything from plain white bulbs to multicolored lightstrips and other bulbs that fit smaller sockets. Just remember you’ll have to connect them to your bridge first.

Light Fixtures

While limited to a few options, Philips light fixtures have the bulbs built directly into them. That means that when the LEDs burn out—which should be at least years, if not more—you’ll have to replace the entire fixture. These also require a bridge (sold separately) to control them via Philips’ app.

Features of a mountain bike light

Lamp body (head unit): This houses the LEDs, the lens in front, the reflectors behind, the circuitry that makes it all work and the fins or ribs that radiate away as much heat as possible.

LEDs: Most lights now use LEDs (light emitting diodes), because they produce more light for less power than a conventional bulb and are far less fragile than HID lamps. Technological advances mean performance has leapt forward in the past few years and each new season brings significant upgrades.

Optics: The reflector and lens in front affect how the light is thrown down the trail. Focused spot beams are great for seeing a long way for a given output; wide flood beams give good peripheral vision.

Mount/bracket: How you attach the light to your bike. Most mounts use clips and spacers but O-rings are a great simple solution. If you are thinking of using a helmet mounted light, you need a lamp that’s light enough to be comfortable and secure on your lid, rather than a neck snapper. You’ll need an extension cable and helmet mount too, so check if that’s included or an optional extra.

Battery: The bit that powers the light. Lighter, tougher, far more random charge resistant lithium ion (Li-Ion) chargeable batteries have revolutionised mountain bike lighting compared with older lead acid and NiMH batteries — but battery and lamp efficiencies still vary dramatically. Most brands sell extra batteries (often at a discount if bought with the light) so you can always swap halfway. Check your batteries are properly prepared for maximum performance (this should be in the instructions) and take a back-up until you know you can rely on their run times.

Switchgear: The switch not only turns the light on, but also lets you change power output levels. It needs to be easy to operate while riding, even with gloves on, but hard to operate accidentally. Many lights now use backlit switches that double as mode and/or run time indicators using traffic-light-style colour changes. Switchgears now range from a simple push button sequential mode switch with low battery warning light to wireless bar-mounted units or switches that can also change the different output levels and menus.

Head or bars

Most lights come with both bar and helmet mounting options. Which is better comes down to personal preference, but here are the pros and cons of each.

The result — it’s a draw! In reality the best solution is to use helmet and bar-mounted lights, even if you have to buy lower powered units to afford both. It also means you have a backup should one battery die.

Jargon buster

Amp-hour — A measurement of battery capacity. The bigger the capacity, the longer your lights will run. You need to divide this value by the amperage the light operates at in order to get the theoretical run time

Bag — A cloth pack that holds the battery onto the bike’s frame

Bar mount — Light bracket that fits around oversize (31.8mm) and/or older 1in (25.4mm) diameter handlebars

Battery cell — The single units that wire together to create a battery pack

Bottle — Plastic water bottle converted to hold a large capacity battery

How we test mountain bike lights

Being stuck on a wet winter’s night, miles from anywhere with a failed light or everything suddenly going pitch black halfway down a technical descent is a really serious matter. That’s why we take our lights testing extremely seriously.

There’s no substitute for time on trail in all weathers to find out this crucial stuff — and we’re not just talking about lights used in the past few months. We also reference the sets we’ve run long-term to get in-depth, worst case use feedback that’s directly relevant to the riding you do.

Product reviewer Guy Kesteven tests run times and cooling

The science side

As is often the case with mountain biking, the scientific part of the testing is the easiest bit. Lights (lamp body plus handlebar bracket) and batteries are weighed on our scales.

We then measure the useful maximum power run time (to when the output fades and low battery warning lights come on) with pre-conditioned (used and recharged) batteries in the highest power setting on an air cooled rig to mimic the cooling effect of riding at night. We also measure the maximum casing heat of the lights with a thermal probe to see if any get dangerously hot.

Light output is calculated using a lux (a measurement of one lumen per square metre) calibrated industrial light meter placed 5m from the lamp in a blacked out workshop. (If the light has more than one beam or head unit we measure both separately and their combined output.)

This method does favour spot beams over flood beams, but it’s still a more trail translatable measurement than the lumen potential of LEDs. The coverage, density and other specific characteristics of the beam are often more important than the peak brightness though, so we also take beam photos to make it easier to compare the lights.

The practical side

It’s the feedback we get from real world usage that really sorts out often very similar lamps in terms of trail performance. When it comes to our test conditions we’re talking serious sorties, often two or three times a week all year round in every trail condition imaginable. Baked hard river bed runs that’ll shake a poor bracket or fragile circuit board apart in seconds or leave a badly bagged battery hanging by its lead; sub-zero tundra trudges that freeze a battery to horribly low maximum power run times; drownings in downpours and hip-deep bog crashes.

Most of our lights have seen it all and, if the most recent versions have only been hammered through summer, we’ve certainly put the models preceding them through the most testing ride schedule possible. Repeated group riding, bike switching, recharging and battery flattening gives us the perfect comparative testing cluster too, so any failures or fading is immediately obvious rather than going unnoticed in isolation.

In other words, if a light scores well, you know it’s gone through some proper optical and electrical purgatory to prove itself. For that reason, for all of our latest lights testing we’ve deliberately stuck with established (at least a year old) lights manufacturers to ensure anything we recommend is a fully supported product.

Light output is calculated using a lux calibrated industrial light meter placed 5m from the lamp in a blacked out workshop

Voltage

Technical Information *Free of Charge Delivery – If your delivery address is within UK Mainland then we ship your order to you free of charge on our 2-day delivery service, with exclusions: highlands, islands and Ireland. If you place your order before2pm, we will do our very best to get your order out the same day. Bulbs are subject to a small delivery charge, if purchased on their own.

Bulb Lifetime

Initially when LED bulbs came out with no standards, manufacturers would claim lifetimes of 100,000 hours with no real testing. Since then the standard has been to scale back to 50,000 hours so as not to over-state claims. (Beware of bulbs that are rated at 100,000 hours unless they state specifically WHY they are rated at so high manufacturing process, heat sink materials etc., I would be wary of trusting this rating).

The lifetime of an LED lamp is generally considered to be the point where the light output has declined to 70% of its initial output, measured in lumens. So, a 300 lumen LED bulb with a lifespan of 50,000 hours will have 2lumens at the end of its lifetime. However, the lifetime of a bulb does not mean it is unusable, only that its light output has degraded to a certain point. The LED bulb may continue to be useful for several thousand hours past its stated lifetime. Unlike old-fashioned light bulbs, it is extremely rare for an LED light to simply burn out. Rather, it will gradually fade over time.

Warm White

You can see that Cree is by far the brightest. However, there are multiple factors, besides the LED chip that determine the brightness of an LED bulb including the power supply and optics (the lens or lenses that are used to diffuse the light).

Start Using LEDs Now!

LEDs are not a good alternative for all bulbs in a business. Depending on the situation, they make sense in some places more than others. The more people who adopt LEDs, the quicker prices will come down. There is no doubt that as prices come down, and efficiency/light output of the bulbs increase, in a couple of years every light bulb in the world will be an LED Light bulb and CFLs and incandescent will be a thing of the past. The initial investment may be a little hard to swallow, but in the long run, youll be doing your part for the environment and your wallet and making the world a cleaner, greener, cooler place to live one bulb at a time for generations to come.

PENDANT LIGHTS

Modern pendant lighting is all about being understated – the focus is on the form, with simple shapes on show. When hanging your pendant light, consider its purpose. Over a dining table, your light should be lower to create intimacy. In heavy traffic areas, such as hallways and living areas, use the tallest household member as a guide to check you’re not creating a collision course.

FLOOR LAMPS

Hit new heights with these illuminating show-stoppers that can take centre stage or create a cosy corner. Be conscious of scale when picking the right floor lamp for your space, advises Mardi. “It needs to relate to the size of the room or furniture near it,” she says. “A large sweeping floor lamp can smother a small room, whereas a well-proportioned piece can really enhance a living space.”

DOWNLIGHTS

Contemporary lights will suit the practical areas of your home – think kitchens, bathrooms and laundries. Modern downlights can bring a seamless sophistication to your kitchen, bathroom or living areas, allowing your hero pieces to shine. They are particularly useful if you are dealing with separate work areas, such as kitchen preparation benches, allowing you to direct the light source to the most practical areas. As with other lighting choices, choose energy-saving options, such as LEDs and fluorescents. These options, while initially more expensive, will save money and need less maintenance over time.

OUTDOOR LIGHTS

Integrated outdoor lighting schemes will make a dramatic impact to your backyard, deck or patio come nightfall. There are two important considerations when choosing outdoor lighting – safety and design. Coordinate your choices with your garden design to showcase the elements in the space, such as large trees, fragrant plants, stone walls or water features. Nat Corrigan from Gardens At Night says that it is important to look at where the garden is viewed from. “You may view the same feature from dif erent areas – multiple light fittings may be required so one aspect doesn’t appear in shadow,” he says. Nat also recommended fittings that are constructed of brass, copper or 31marine-grade stainless steel, to ensure that fittings will last longer. In terms of safety, make sure uneven pathways are well lit and stairways are highlighted. Check that any transformers are situated in convenient locations.

LED TRACK LIGHTING

Highlight your home’s architectural elements with this energy-ef icient, easy-care option. LED lighting has become the new darling in illumination, especially for kitchens and bathrooms. Sales manager of Superlight, Gordon MacVicar says that demand for the strip lighting has steadily increased over the past few years. “We have been doing LED track lighting for about six years and as the cost has come down, the demand has increased,” Gordon says. He adds that when people are investing in spectacular kitchen splashbacks or bathroom fittings, it is only natural that they want to highlight them with some clever lighting. LED track lighting is energy-ef icient, versatile and generates very little heat, making it also ideal for subtle lighting along stairways, windows and floors. The strips are manufactured to length, allowing lots of flexibility for homeowners. Gordon says that most residential projects choose a warm light option or, if it’s going in a clean white kitchen or bathroom, a 4000 kelvin light will provide a slightly cooler colour tone. Another great thing about LED strips? They are virtually maintenance free, says Gordon and usually don’t need replacing. “You can just set and forget them,” he says.

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Beam pattern

We’ve included pictures of all the beam patterns to show how the light falls on the trail. Hot spots and hard focused lines at the edges of the beam are distracting and make it more difficult to use peripheral vision when riding. You want soft transitions and edges, and a pool around the front wheel for picking your way through technical terrain.

The lumen is a measure of light output — the higher the number, the brighter the light. Some manufacturers quote measured lumens, but obviously they’ve done all the measuring themselves. We’ve printed quoted lumens, but we have measured all the lights, and if there’s a big discrepancy between the two figures, we’ve said so in the test.

Bar mounting

An O-ring makes a lot of sense because it can be removed easily, expands to accommodate different diameter handlebars, including 35mm, and the lamp can be angled up or down easily. Clamp-on mounts (aluminium or plastic) are better for heavy lights because they’re rattle-free and more secure. However, often only a 31.8mm is included, so if you’re running 35mm bars you may need to buy an additional clamp.

All-in-one designs

An all-in-one design is where the battery and lamp are contained in a single unit (see left). There are fewer parts in the box, you don’t have any flapping cables, and the system is lighter, with less battery mounting issues. The whole thing can be removed quickly for charging and storage as well.

Helmet mounting

Usually helmet clamps are plastic and held in place with twin Velcro straps that loop through the helmet vents, although Exposure employs a clamp that bolts through a single vent. It needs to pivot, so you can adjust the angle, and be secure, so the light doesn’t fall out if you catch it on a low branch.

How we test

Testing lights is a solitary business, because having other riders around interferes with the beam pattern and output. For accuracy, we mapped out an 18-minute test loop and conducted dozens of solo runs with all the lights.

To make it as fair as possible we tested all the powerful lights on their own, the helmet lights with a Hope Rbar light fitted, and the mid-range lights with an Exposure Joystick up top.

We toggled between the dimmer settings for the climbs and full power on all the descents.

To measure the light output, we also plugged all of the test lights into an integrating sphere, which is a scientific instrument that measures lumens.

 

 

 

 

How to save up to 86%? Here is little trick.

You must visit the page of sales. Here is the link. If you don’t care about which brand is better, then you can choose the Complete Track Lighting Kits by the price and buy from the one who will offer the greatest discount.

 

 

Final Word

First of all thanks for reading my article to the end! I hope you find my reviews listed here useful and that it allows you to make a proper comparison of what is best to fit your needs and budget. Don’t be afraid to try more than one product if your first pick doesn’t do the trick.

Most important, have fun and choose your Complete Track Lighting Kits wisely! Good luck!

So, TOP3 of Complete Track Lighting Kits

 

 

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